E.J.Wilkins

19 Oct 2006 779 views
 
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photoblog image Young love?

Young love?

These are 'this years' cygnets, one of them is possibly the fluffy little bundle I shared with you on 10th October .

I took this picture yesterday, bravely moving away from the camera's 'auto' setting . I had set the camera on 'shutter priority' to see what happened. Maybe I should have switched it back before taking this shot, even though they were moving quite quickly and were about fifty yards away. The neck feathers are a different texture to those on the rest of their body, almost furry.

The picture's been cropped and adjusted for colour and contrast.

Young love?

These are 'this years' cygnets, one of them is possibly the fluffy little bundle I shared with you on 10th October .

I took this picture yesterday, bravely moving away from the camera's 'auto' setting . I had set the camera on 'shutter priority' to see what happened. Maybe I should have switched it back before taking this shot, even though they were moving quite quickly and were about fifty yards away. The neck feathers are a different texture to those on the rest of their body, almost furry.

The picture's been cropped and adjusted for colour and contrast.

comments (17)

  • rabby
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 19 Oct 2006, 00:58
the necks and heads look very 'celtic' like the beasts found in knotwork designs ellie, pity the cygnets were not in a symetrical view otherwise this i would have rated as really top notch, nonetheless it is a cool photograph.
EJWilkins: Thanks Rabby .. I hadn't thought of the shape in that way. Celtic designs are based on nature, aren't they?
  • Suby
  • Milton Keynes, UK
  • 19 Oct 2006, 01:56
Lovers crossed :d Perfect moment captured.

Suby
EJWilkins: Thanks Suby smile
Excellent !
EJWilkins: Hi Florence, thanks I'm glad you like the picture smile
  • Mal
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 19 Oct 2006, 08:33
Right place right time El, very good shot. Mal
EJWilkins: Thanks Mal. Yes, I struck lucky smile
  • adebanji
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • 19 Oct 2006, 10:00
their beaks and necks nake the shape of a heart.
romantique!
EJWilkins: That's what I thought too Adebanji, perhaps I should have saved the shot for Valentine's Day next year wink
  • Chantal
  • Netherlands
  • 19 Oct 2006, 12:19
Very beautiful shot, love the touching 'mouths'
EJWilkins: They were almost. They greeted each other very tenderly, it was lovely to watch.
Ellie this is so cool! smile What a great combination of steller composition, timing, and a watchful eye! Good work with the experimenting with different options on your camera. You were very successful!
EJWilkins: Thanks Sparklite, kind of you to say so. I was very lucky to be there at the right time for this shot smile
  • paul
  • United Kingdom
  • 19 Oct 2006, 16:24
perfect timing Ellie
EJWilkins: Thanks Paul smile
  • chris p
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 19 Oct 2006, 18:09
Keep on trying things out Ellie, well spotted smile
EJWilkins: Will do Chris, thanks smile
Oh my heart smile Very good shot and good eyes to notice that !
EJWilkins: *grin* Thanks Zeblgleb
  • Tinuke
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 19 Oct 2006, 19:55
Very good shot, the pping really focuses on the feathers, and gives it an awesome look.
EJWilkins: Thanks Tinuke. It's nice to watch these little ones grow up into swans. I don't know which will be their next white feathers. At the moment they look unusual with some white and some brown, they still blend in with their surroundings very well.
Another excellent pic, Ellie. You certainly have a knack for capturing wildlife. Don't worry about auto or manual settings; it's capturing the moment that is the skill. The mechanics of how you arrive at the image are not really important!
EJWilkins: Thanks David. smile It's very kind of you to say so, reassuring too. I must remember to take off my 'worrying head' a little more often! (I hope you remember Worzel Gummidge!)
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 19 Oct 2006, 22:48
First of all, it is a pity that it took me so long to get around to your blog again. Bit busy. Anyhow, you know that I also like to do the birds. Now first of all I don't know your camera, so I don't know what options you have for shutter priority. What I do with my camera is to use auto as much as possible - but when you take bird photo's it happens a lot that they are in or under trees that gives a lot of shade. For these instances I have created my own settings under P with ISO on 800 (apperture). I can easily dial shutterspeed on my camera, but only do so to a slower speed when I am working with a tripod. So in effect I have a pre-configured setting available if I have to shoot in shade. Point is that birds are restless and fast and won't allow you to experiment. With the auto and pre-configured options I can select fast if necessary.

If you have basic modes (can select portrait, nature, night time, etc) trust these and save you time to work out what shutter and or apperture to use.

This photo is a good one and I agree that spotting the moment is more important - but on the other hand you would like to take a good shot when that moment happens.

Remember that you are working with a digital and can afford experiment when the oppotunity arrises.

Enjoy photography and take care.
EJWilkins: Yep, thanks for all that Louis. smile I think I'd be better keeping some of my 'experimental shots' under wraps. The more I look at this one the more embarrassing it is, although the idea was good at the time.
they are so sweet..young timeless love. thanks for this pic.
  • chunter
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 Oct 2006, 08:40
Louis and David both make very valid points. The art is in the seeing in the first place. The camera and the image editing software are the tools you use to make the image you see, so it's really important to get to know them well.

This image, lovely as it is, appears to be a little under-exposed to me, probably because the reflection from the water has fooled the exposure meter. So the thing to concentrate on here is the metering selection.

I believe your Dimage Z5 also has 'spot' and 'centre-weighted' metering options. Spot metering would have helped here. Select spot metering, point at the object you want exposed correctly, half-press and hold the shutter to 'lock' the exposure, then recompose as required and press the shutter the rest of the way.

This technique works with most compact cameras too, even if they don't have selectable metering patterns. Go on, give it a whirl.

Oh dear, waffle waffle. Here ends the lecture!
EJWilkins: *grin* Ah, but it would be nice if the 'art' would get itself in focus!

Err, I'm pretty sure the Z5 has got 'spot' focussing, I'll have to try it out, thanks for the pointer (and reminder).
  • Bavand
  • Iran
  • 11 Nov 2006, 18:45
How lovely!
Sometimes I miss such adays.
  • Lamar Cole
  • United States
  • 17 Nov 2006, 17:43
Two young lovers, kissing in the moonlight, is a silhouette of love.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera DiMAGE Z5
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/500s
aperture f/4.5
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 69.4mm
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