E.J.Wilkins

12 Nov 2006 847 views
 
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photoblog image St Nicholas Church, Brockenhurst

St Nicholas Church, Brockenhurst


New Zealand Commonwealth War Cemetery

At St Nicholas Church in Brockenhurst, Hampshire, are Commonwealth War Graves. They mark the final resting place of almost a hundred New Zealand men who died during World War I.

18,166 New Zealanders died in this war. That is 7% of all men aged between 18 and 45, from a country that then had a population of 1,090,000.
Total New Zealand casualties were about 55,000, and of those 21,004 were treated in New Zealand General Hospital in the village of Brockenhurst before it was closed in 1919.

The original wooden crosses marking the graves were replaced in 1924 and this cenotaph was erected in 1927. The area is maintained under the auspices of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

After the war a collection in New Zealand provided funds for a church bell to be struck and engraved.
The New Zealand flag, donated by the hospital commandant, hangs inside the church alongside a Roll of Honour.
A special memorial service is held here on Anzac Day (25th April)
There is a service and wreaths are laid on Remembrance Sunday in November.
Red poppies are placed alongside each grave where they remain throughout the year unless they are taken by the squirrels.


These men are remembered.



my vfxy

St Nicholas Church, Brockenhurst


New Zealand Commonwealth War Cemetery

At St Nicholas Church in Brockenhurst, Hampshire, are Commonwealth War Graves. They mark the final resting place of almost a hundred New Zealand men who died during World War I.

18,166 New Zealanders died in this war. That is 7% of all men aged between 18 and 45, from a country that then had a population of 1,090,000.
Total New Zealand casualties were about 55,000, and of those 21,004 were treated in New Zealand General Hospital in the village of Brockenhurst before it was closed in 1919.

The original wooden crosses marking the graves were replaced in 1924 and this cenotaph was erected in 1927. The area is maintained under the auspices of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

After the war a collection in New Zealand provided funds for a church bell to be struck and engraved.
The New Zealand flag, donated by the hospital commandant, hangs inside the church alongside a Roll of Honour.
A special memorial service is held here on Anzac Day (25th April)
There is a service and wreaths are laid on Remembrance Sunday in November.
Red poppies are placed alongside each grave where they remain throughout the year unless they are taken by the squirrels.


These men are remembered.



my vfxy

comments (16)

You and I, Ellie. Great minds think alike! My heart swells to see this image of yours. The war to end all wars, they called it....Someone's not reading from the same hymn sheet....
EJWilkins: Thank you, and I agree.
Oh yeah, nice touch with the little blasts of colour, very clever!
EJWilkins: Thank you, it was difficult to decide what to do so that I didn't make the picture insensitive.
These were real and very brave people, some as young as 18, who died some 12,000 miles from their home.
  • PhotoSam
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 12 Nov 2006, 06:55
excellent selective desat and a great tribute..8/10
EJWilkins: Thank you Sam.
Great work Ellie. How many people in UK actually know about this? I suppose the new generation, from what I have read about them, would not give a damn anyway. Love the colour from the NZ flag and thr poppies dotted around. Nicely angled shot. Regards, Neil.
EJWilkins: Hi Neil, thank you. I don't think many know about this corner of a village churchyard, but there are frequent visitors from New Zealand.
  • Suby
  • Milton Keynes, UK
  • 12 Nov 2006, 09:44
I always love the history lessons from different cultures and regions of the world. Nice one.

Suby
EJWilkins: Thank you Suby. Without men like these, some were only 18, I am sure that England, Britain and the world might have been very different.
  • Paul
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 12 Nov 2006, 09:59
The processing really suits the subject matter here
EJWilkins: Thanks Paul.
  • Sidak
  • India
  • 12 Nov 2006, 11:04
i respect those who fight for their country and pride, most of my family has as well.

suitable pp but is that the pp?? since the flag is in original colours ?? let me know.
EJWilkins: Hi Sidak, and thanks, we all have personal memories on this day.

Yes, the picture was processed. I took the it on Thursday this week.
I copied it, changed one to sepia and then c/p the flag and poppies. There may be a better way, but I don't know what it is.
  • chris p
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 12 Nov 2006, 11:46
Very poignant Ellie.
EJWilkins: Thanks Chris.
Very nice and emotionnal shot ! Bravo ! smile
EJWilkins: Thank you Zeb.
  • Ginnie
  • United States
  • 12 Nov 2006, 15:05
The "bit bright" NZ flag is exactly what gives this pic its power for me, Ellie. NZ as a country is still very alive and well! So it seems appropriate that you have processed it this way, in honor of their valiant dead.

Yesterday was our Veterans Day here in America, in remembrance of WW1. This post today is a good reminder that that war really was a World War and involved our young men everywhere!

My NZ friend will be very happy to see this, so I will send her the link. Thanks.
Conversion works well here...nice..
wow - looks very grey to me, but more for a place in morning. Beautiful shot.
  • Vyder
  • India
  • 12 Nov 2006, 19:11
thats a beautiful picture...and processed very well too...

i like the feel of the photo...sort of calming..
  • dafredo
  • France
  • 12 Nov 2006, 20:32
Nice piece of history Ellie!
  • Yvon
  • Belgium
  • 12 Nov 2006, 22:30
Great photo for their memory.
Thaks for Them.
Yvon.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 15 Nov 2006, 21:20
Nice shot and research. What I love about your blog.

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