E.J.Wilkins

06 Jun 2007 562 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Cromeleque dos Almendres

Cromeleque dos Almendres

This picture, the same as the yesterday's, was taken just before dusk in February. By the time we had walked the hundred yards or so back to our car it was dark enough to need the lights on the car. It made the journey back along the couple of miles of rough road quite interesting.

We were, frankly, amazed by the site. We only visited by chance, having seen the sign for "Cromeleque" as we travelled along the main road between Évora and Lisbon.

There are no tourist features; there is no 'protection' other than the sign I've copied out below; there are no guided tours; there are no leaflets. But, it's amazing!

Truly an impressive place, way off the 'beaten track' and very well worth a visit although you might find it difficult to spend more than an hour there unless you are particularly interested and knowledgeable about neolithic cultures and structures.

.....

I thought I'd experiment with this one and convert it to mono. I think it has more impact this way.
What do you think?
.....

These stones are somewhere about - here -

There is a large sign at the stones, written in Portuguese and English reads

"Cromeleque dos Almendres
A National Monument (Decrete 735/78 de 21/12/1974)
The megalithic enclosure of Almendres, one of the first public monuments in the human history, comprises the largest group of menhirs to have been erected on the Iberia Peninsula, and one of the most important in Europe.
This megalithic monument originally consisted of more than a hundred monoliths. The excavation have made possible the detection of various phases of construction throughout the Neolithic period (the 5th to the 4th millennia BC) to the point where it acquired an appearance similar to that which is found today.
There are 92 menhirs, with different shapes and dimensions, some small, rudely shaped blocks, others of greater size which have given the place the name of Alto das Pedras Talhas.
They form two enclosures erected in different, distinct epoch, geminated, and aligned to accord with the equinoxes. Ten of the monoliths are decorated, exhibiting rellets or engravings.
It was a monument which had religious functions, and was probably also a primitive astronomical observatory.
This monument is situated in the Herdade dos Almendres estate owned by Jose Manuel Neves.
The school with has adopted (Escola EB1 de Agua de Upe) and the Guadalupe local council request that you treat this pre-historic munument, and the area surrounding it, with pride and respect."

....
If you have a spare moment, please visit my vfxy
.

Cromeleque dos Almendres

This picture, the same as the yesterday's, was taken just before dusk in February. By the time we had walked the hundred yards or so back to our car it was dark enough to need the lights on the car. It made the journey back along the couple of miles of rough road quite interesting.

We were, frankly, amazed by the site. We only visited by chance, having seen the sign for "Cromeleque" as we travelled along the main road between Évora and Lisbon.

There are no tourist features; there is no 'protection' other than the sign I've copied out below; there are no guided tours; there are no leaflets. But, it's amazing!

Truly an impressive place, way off the 'beaten track' and very well worth a visit although you might find it difficult to spend more than an hour there unless you are particularly interested and knowledgeable about neolithic cultures and structures.

.....

I thought I'd experiment with this one and convert it to mono. I think it has more impact this way.
What do you think?
.....

These stones are somewhere about - here -

There is a large sign at the stones, written in Portuguese and English reads

"Cromeleque dos Almendres
A National Monument (Decrete 735/78 de 21/12/1974)
The megalithic enclosure of Almendres, one of the first public monuments in the human history, comprises the largest group of menhirs to have been erected on the Iberia Peninsula, and one of the most important in Europe.
This megalithic monument originally consisted of more than a hundred monoliths. The excavation have made possible the detection of various phases of construction throughout the Neolithic period (the 5th to the 4th millennia BC) to the point where it acquired an appearance similar to that which is found today.
There are 92 menhirs, with different shapes and dimensions, some small, rudely shaped blocks, others of greater size which have given the place the name of Alto das Pedras Talhas.
They form two enclosures erected in different, distinct epoch, geminated, and aligned to accord with the equinoxes. Ten of the monoliths are decorated, exhibiting rellets or engravings.
It was a monument which had religious functions, and was probably also a primitive astronomical observatory.
This monument is situated in the Herdade dos Almendres estate owned by Jose Manuel Neves.
The school with has adopted (Escola EB1 de Agua de Upe) and the Guadalupe local council request that you treat this pre-historic munument, and the area surrounding it, with pride and respect."

....
If you have a spare moment, please visit my vfxy
.

comments (23)

  • Jimbo
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • 6 Jun 2007, 00:15
Is there any way of knowing if the siite sloped way back in megalithic times, or has this just happened over time? Are some of the stones more buried than others?
I think I like the conversion better El and Jim has a very good question there. In my very limited experience some stones will be deeper then others for a reason.
The mono conversion is a really good idea. It does a great job of focusing the viewer on the multitude of stones rather the extraneous color. However, I think this conversion could have more impact with a little contrast/levels/curve adjustment to keep the stones from blending into the background.
I like this even more with the conversion. It has more drama.
What an interesting site. It's very moody in black and white. That was a good choice. I think there is merit to what Martin says about playing with the contrast a bit more.
the BW works for this shot.
Impressive site Ellie. I can't imagine the weight of each stones !! I wonder how they've managed to raise them up liked this ? Incredible !
  • Neil Tandy
  • Johannesburg, South Africa, currently Wales
  • 6 Jun 2007, 05:25
Very impressive Elli and I do like the mono conversion. Many regards, Neil.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 6 Jun 2007, 06:14
Hi Ellie. This one is even more dramatic than yesterday's excellent post. B&W conversion works well. The lichen stands out impressively.
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 6 Jun 2007, 07:57
Definitely, the mono works well here, Ellie.

It really intrigues me that this is such a low-key place as far as tourist info goes. But it's probably good, to keep it from being run over with people. I can just imagine what this would look like with people all over the place! So we can be thankful you just happened to find it!
I do prefer it in mono, Ellie. Lovely find and shot.
Pues creo que la perspectiva y el B&W hacen esta fotografía muy buena. Caminando entre esas estructuras megalíticas, uno, se siente transportado a otros tiempos. Me fascinan estos lugares. Además, según explicas, es toda una aventura su visita !! Bravo, Ellie! smile

Then I believe that the perspective and the B&W make this photography very good. Walking between those megalíticas structures, one, one feels transported to other times. They fascinate these places to me. In addition, according to you explain, is all an adventure its visit! Bravo, Ellie! smile
A truly amazing place .. this place has a lot of history
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 6 Jun 2007, 12:38
The B&W version has more detail! Great picture.
These photographs are very atmospheric.
I agree with you, more impact in BW - here I love the washed out sky smile
These monolithic structures work so well in B and W. I love these sort of places but my wife, a history graduate I might add, thinks they are boring piles of rock! Nice shot. All the best, Dave
Good shot of an intriguing place. I don't really think the B+W conversion helps- yes it makes it look more "historical" but the tone of the rock is so similar to the ground that there will never be much separation. Worth trying to raise the contrast though.
Amazing place Ellie.
What a great treatment, Ellie. I like the description provided as well.
  • Julischka
  • the black hole where time disappears
  • 7 Jun 2007, 18:20
In b/w I like it a lot more. Well done!
  • telemachus
  • place with no standing stones
  • 8 Jun 2007, 05:04
Hi Ellie.

Standing stones are haunting things.

Good B&W. I'm haunted.
  • nev
  • Australia
  • 14 Jun 2007, 23:55
Looks like a giant shotput graveyard. Like the conversion alot Ellie

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a constructive critical comments icon ShMood©
camera E-400
exposure mode A-DEP program
shutterspeed 1/30s
aperture f/3.5
sensitivity ISO320
focal length 14.0mm
Tallinn MemorialTallinn Memorial
PinkPink
Cromeleque dos AlmendresCromeleque dos A...

Warning