E.J.Wilkins

12 Jun 2007 683 views
 
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photoblog image S for snake

S for snake

I took this picture earlier today, and was told it isn't a snake, it's an eel, but that wouldn't have made such a good title.

This is a wall tie, between this and another one of the opposite side of the building will be a steel rod, held in place and tensioned by the nut you can see in the middle of the 'S'. The idea is that it stops the building collapsing outwards.

This is an old building, Eling Tide Mill, which sits right next to Southampton Water - here -  to the west of Southampton. It's the only functioning Tide Mill in the United Kingdom. According to the website it's only one of two in the world that uses tidal energy to grind flour.

There's been a mill on this site for at least 900 years, it was mentioned in the Domesday Book. The current building is at least 230 years old.
http://www.elingtidemill.wanadoo.co.uk/sitem.html

.....
If you have a spare moment, please visit my vfxy
.

S for snake

I took this picture earlier today, and was told it isn't a snake, it's an eel, but that wouldn't have made such a good title.

This is a wall tie, between this and another one of the opposite side of the building will be a steel rod, held in place and tensioned by the nut you can see in the middle of the 'S'. The idea is that it stops the building collapsing outwards.

This is an old building, Eling Tide Mill, which sits right next to Southampton Water - here -  to the west of Southampton. It's the only functioning Tide Mill in the United Kingdom. According to the website it's only one of two in the world that uses tidal energy to grind flour.

There's been a mill on this site for at least 900 years, it was mentioned in the Domesday Book. The current building is at least 230 years old.
http://www.elingtidemill.wanadoo.co.uk/sitem.html

.....
If you have a spare moment, please visit my vfxy
.

comments (20)

Snake, eel...not much difference. Great image, and the history is captivating. I've never heard of a tide mill before. Seems like such a good idea.
The colors are so pleasing.
EJWilkins: It seems a very sensible idea doesn't it smile
This is a great photo representing a place I wouldn't know anything about except for reading what you have written. A wonderful history lesson, and a great choice for this image.
EJWilkins: It's a very unimposing building, surrounded by new stuff and power lines, so hard to photograph as a whole, so I thought I'd choose an interesting bit wink
  • alex
  • 12 Jun 2007, 04:04
interesting history. they use the same sort of ties on buildings at Stanford, where i went to school, but as reinforcement for buildings to make it through earthquakes. they're not as decorative as this though.
EJWilkins: I've never seen one with a head on it, it's actually been cast that way rather than just painted on.
  • Jimbo
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • 12 Jun 2007, 06:33
Thanks for the fascinating background, Ellie. I really like the door, too. It looks beautifully made.
EJWilkins: It's a nicely made door, but sadly is quite modern.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 12 Jun 2007, 07:02
Oh snakes alive! Great shot and composition Ellie, I think you and Ginnie's courses are converging smile
EJWilkins: Eurgh! Punny!
... and I'm off to look at some pictures ...
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 12 Jun 2007, 08:36
LOL at Louis...again! smile

I see these wall ties all the time here in Europe, Ellie, but have never really known exactly what they're for. I've always assumed they're for some kind of stabilization, but to keep the building from collapsing OUTward makes sense. Does the rod go through the walls clear through to the other side, I wonder?

Anyway, the wood, the steel the brick--I love all the textures!
EJWilkins: The rod is there to tension these brackets, pull them inwards. They're positioned over the part of the wall that is at risk. The 'S' shape keeps the brickwork in place, I think. I've seen X-shaped ones and rectangular ones too.
Well spotted, Ellie! (:o)
EJWilkins: Thanks Ros, have you ever been there?
Very nicely composed Ellie.
EJWilkins: thanks Bridge smile
Ours are star shaped. I like your eel. Wonder about how that mill works and why the workings of the mill don't get rusty from saltwater.

Nice capture and interesting bit of history.
EJWilkins: If I remember rightly from when we visited years ago, the majority of the mill's working bits and pieces are wooden. When I went there yesterday I found I'd managed to arrive on the only day it's closed, and couldn't see the wheel from the road.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 12 Jun 2007, 13:24
I like everything about this post, Ellie, including the narrative.
EJWilkins: Pleased to hear that Ray, thanks smile
Es cierto!, es una anguila!! .Pero que relación tiene una anguila con un molino de harina? Quizás es por la proximidad al mar? Una composición que me gusta mucho, Ellie ! smile

It is certain, it is an eel! Pero that relation has an eel with a flour mill? Perhaps it is by the proximity to the sea? A composition that I like much, Ellie! smile
EJWilkins: I think it looks more like an eel than a snake. I think perhaps there are a lot of eels in the water here, but I don't know if people still fish for them.
Glad you like it Jose smile
Pienso que mira más como una anguila que una serpiente. Pienso que quizás hay muchos de anguilas en el agua aquí, pero no sé si la gente todavía pesca para ellas. Alegre usted tiene gusto de ella Jose smile
  • Les Auld
  • Southport UK
  • 12 Jun 2007, 14:11
Nice detail, interesting history, well seen.
EJWilkins: Thanks Les smile
  • mal
  • 12 Jun 2007, 16:31
Really lovely composition Ellie, simple image but so engaging, lovely image. mal
EJWilkins: Thanks Mal, I need to 'get out' and this was one excursion that wasn't as productive as I'd hoped.
Hope you're OK ... will mail smile
cool...good capture and really like the inclusion of the top right bit of the door...
EJWilkins: Thanks Sam, it was hard to decide how much of the door to include in case it was overpowering. Glad you think I got it right.
My, my, that's very old. Good to hear of the history in this nice shot.
EJWilkins: It is old isn't it, it surprised me too because the building didn't look particularly ancient.
Not seen one decorated like that before Ellie, and there are quite a few of them over here!
EJWilkins: No, nor have I Chris. The 'head' was actually part of the casting, it hasn't just been painted on although with layers of paint it's almost flush with the black.
Hi Ellie - love the range of red/browns - you certainly like to provide all the background to your shots. will have to wait to the weekend to check out refs - on dial up during the week. Mike
EJWilkins: I knew the mill was old, but had no real idea how old, until I looked it up. The details are here as much as an aide memoire for me as to share with others. I think it makes the pictures a bit more relevant. Thanks Mike smile
Nice eyes to notice that !
Wonderful shot. Lovely colours. I feel this might look even better in B&W
  • sparklite
  • Toronto, Canada.
  • 22 Jun 2007, 03:22
Great colour. Ain't that e-400 wonderful wink

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