E.J.Wilkins

11 Nov 2007 662 views
 
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photoblog image The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month

I took this picture in Lymington last year, at 11:00 on the morning of 11th November.

Following the signing of Armistice Treaty at Compiegne, France at 05:00, at 11:00 on 11th November 1918 the great guns that had been firing since 1914 fell silent and Europe was at peace, ending what was then termed "The Great War" or "The War to end all Wars".

The idea to hold 'a silence' is attributed variously to Australian Edward Honey, Sir Percy Fitzpatrick from South Africa and  Mr J. A Eggar from Farnham in Surrey.

Whoever's idea it was, it was King George V's letter to The Times that brought it to the attention of the public and the Armistice Day tradition of remembrance and respect began.

"To all my people" Buckingham Palace, 7th November, 1919.

Tuesday next, November 11th, is the first anniversary of the Armistice, which stayed the world-wide carnage of the four preceding years and marked the victory of Right and Freedom. I believe that my people in every part of the Empire fervently wish to perpetuate the memory of that Great Deliverance, and of those who laid down their lives to achieve it.

To afford an opportunity for the universal expression of this feeling it is my desire and hope that at the hour when the Armistice came into force, the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, there may be, for the brief space of two minutes, a complete suspension of all our normal activities. During that time, except in the rare cases where this may be impracticable, all work, all sound, and all locomotives should cease, so that, in perfect stillness, the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the Glorious Dead.

No elaborate organisation appears to be necessary. At a given signal, which can easily be arranged to suit the circumstances of each locality, I believe that we shall all gladly interrupt our business and pleasure, whatever it may be, and unite in this simple service of Silence and Remembrance.

George R.I.


After the 1939-1945 World War the day was renamed Remembrance Day, and now the events help the nation remember, with gratitude, the lives of those who died in conflict.

Here in Lymington a maroon is fired to mark both the beginning and the end of the silence. People stop whatever they are doing, cars pull over to the side of the road and shoppers put down their bags and bow their heads.

On the Sunday nearest 11th November, as well as the national service and parade at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London, beginning at 11:00 there are multi-denominational services held in churches, community centres and alongside memorials such the Celtic Cross at the front of this picture. These services are attended by local people as well as those parading with pride in their best uniforms ~ members of The Royal British Legion; Army; Navy; Air Force and their Cadet groups; members of the Police, Fire Brigade, Ambulance Service and other civilian groups; Scouts; Guides and other youth groups. Wreathes of poppies, which are also worn by those attending, are placed around the base of the memorial and a little garden of tiny crosses, each bearing the name of a fallen serviceman, servicewoman or civilian who lost their life.

The first "Poppy Day" was held in 1921. Inspired by John MacRae's poem

In Flanders' Fields
John McCrae, 1915

In Flanders' fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders' fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe;
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high,
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders' Fields.

This year saw the opening of ~ The National Memorial Arboretum ~ in Staffordshire, the new Armed Services Memorial for those who have given their lives whilst on active duty or as a result of terrorist action since 1945.

..........

For more information about The Two Minute Silence visit ~ The Imperial War Museum ~

Visit  ~ The Royal British Legion ~ to find out more about this Ex-Service community and what it does today.

To know more about Poppy Day ~ The Poppy Appeal ~ and the opportunity to make donations.


The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month

I took this picture in Lymington last year, at 11:00 on the morning of 11th November.

Following the signing of Armistice Treaty at Compiegne, France at 05:00, at 11:00 on 11th November 1918 the great guns that had been firing since 1914 fell silent and Europe was at peace, ending what was then termed "The Great War" or "The War to end all Wars".

The idea to hold 'a silence' is attributed variously to Australian Edward Honey, Sir Percy Fitzpatrick from South Africa and  Mr J. A Eggar from Farnham in Surrey.

Whoever's idea it was, it was King George V's letter to The Times that brought it to the attention of the public and the Armistice Day tradition of remembrance and respect began.

"To all my people" Buckingham Palace, 7th November, 1919.

Tuesday next, November 11th, is the first anniversary of the Armistice, which stayed the world-wide carnage of the four preceding years and marked the victory of Right and Freedom. I believe that my people in every part of the Empire fervently wish to perpetuate the memory of that Great Deliverance, and of those who laid down their lives to achieve it.

To afford an opportunity for the universal expression of this feeling it is my desire and hope that at the hour when the Armistice came into force, the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, there may be, for the brief space of two minutes, a complete suspension of all our normal activities. During that time, except in the rare cases where this may be impracticable, all work, all sound, and all locomotives should cease, so that, in perfect stillness, the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the Glorious Dead.

No elaborate organisation appears to be necessary. At a given signal, which can easily be arranged to suit the circumstances of each locality, I believe that we shall all gladly interrupt our business and pleasure, whatever it may be, and unite in this simple service of Silence and Remembrance.

George R.I.


After the 1939-1945 World War the day was renamed Remembrance Day, and now the events help the nation remember, with gratitude, the lives of those who died in conflict.

Here in Lymington a maroon is fired to mark both the beginning and the end of the silence. People stop whatever they are doing, cars pull over to the side of the road and shoppers put down their bags and bow their heads.

On the Sunday nearest 11th November, as well as the national service and parade at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London, beginning at 11:00 there are multi-denominational services held in churches, community centres and alongside memorials such the Celtic Cross at the front of this picture. These services are attended by local people as well as those parading with pride in their best uniforms ~ members of The Royal British Legion; Army; Navy; Air Force and their Cadet groups; members of the Police, Fire Brigade, Ambulance Service and other civilian groups; Scouts; Guides and other youth groups. Wreathes of poppies, which are also worn by those attending, are placed around the base of the memorial and a little garden of tiny crosses, each bearing the name of a fallen serviceman, servicewoman or civilian who lost their life.

The first "Poppy Day" was held in 1921. Inspired by John MacRae's poem

In Flanders' Fields
John McCrae, 1915

In Flanders' fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders' fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe;
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high,
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders' Fields.

This year saw the opening of ~ The National Memorial Arboretum ~ in Staffordshire, the new Armed Services Memorial for those who have given their lives whilst on active duty or as a result of terrorist action since 1945.

..........

For more information about The Two Minute Silence visit ~ The Imperial War Museum ~

Visit  ~ The Royal British Legion ~ to find out more about this Ex-Service community and what it does today.

To know more about Poppy Day ~ The Poppy Appeal ~ and the opportunity to make donations.


comments (17)

  • Ginnie
  • United States
  • 11 Nov 2007, 01:44
I declare, Ellie. I am really getting my education today about your Remembrance Sunday. It's clearly on the collective conscience there.

Besides all that, you have a weather vane and clock for me, as well as old architecture, all of which I love, as you know.

I will remember with you....
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 11 Nov 2007, 07:38
Lovely photo, and thankyou for the history behind it. Even though we practice the minutes silence and remember those who died I didn't know the history of that silence.
  • mick
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 11 Nov 2007, 08:33
lovely photo on a special day.welcome back.
  • Les Auld
  • Southport in the dark and the wind
  • 11 Nov 2007, 09:13
There are many people who either can't be bothered or don't realise just what the silence is all about. One day I suppose it will just fade away but we should not forget those who have fallen for their country. Good words to accompany a significant picture. Well posted Ellie.
  • Tracy
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 11 Nov 2007, 10:14
Fitting post for Rememberance Sunday Ellie. smile
  • ray
  • Thailand
  • 11 Nov 2007, 11:19
very impressive post today, Ellie. I learned something, and I got an impressive photo to look at as well. Thanks.
Good photo Ellie and a fitting tribute. Once again excellent blogging, I too learnt a few things from reading your notes.
Great picture and comments for this very special day
The best blog of the blog of the day Ellie - those cobwebs have blown away already.
  • PhotoSam
  • United Kingdom
  • 11 Nov 2007, 12:23
nice work on the toning and the sel colouring...this is a powerful one...
Una interesantísima historia que nos cuentas, Ellie. Yo imagino que esta fotografía, para tí, debe ser especial. Se han unido muchas coincidencias alrededor del número 11 y eso, sin duda debe decir algo! En cuanto a la foto, has hecho un tratamiento que resulta muy bueno! Me gusta mucho esa composición!

A most interesting history that you tell us, Ellie. I imagine that this photography, for tí, must be special. Many coincidences around number the 11 and that have been united, without a doubt it must say something! As far as the photo, you have made a treatment that is very good! I like much that composition!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 11 Nov 2007, 15:56
This is such an Ellie post, thank you for that. I hope you travel safely back home.

We had Flanders Field as one of our literature study poems at school. We had a girl very good at reciting and when she said the second 'in Flanders Fields' line, she normally had half the girls in the class crying. You do bring memories back for me - memories of school days.

Excellent picture and comment - love the selective colouring.
  • Martin
  • Houston
  • 11 Nov 2007, 15:57
Interesting toning and textures. Works well with the old stone.
Wonderful photograph, Ellie, I know it well. You text, as ever is thoughtful, and very informative. I`ve missed it while you have been away. (:o)
A fitting shot for today. We visited the new memorial last week and my picture today was taken there.
  • Steve
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 11 Nov 2007, 23:05
A splendid composition for today Ellie. Very interesting background about the silence too, that I'm ashamed to admit I didn't know.
  • Iain
  • Toronto, Canada
  • 16 Nov 2007, 03:47
Ellie! I didn't realize you were back!! smile This is a great photo - I love the colour!
EJWilkins: Thanks Iain, I wasn't 100% sure it would work, but I wanted to try to make it look both old and new at the same time .. because this scene has been happening for almost 100 years when people remember the fallen.

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