E.J.Wilkins

16 Nov 2007 536 views
 
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At the 'lottie'

Here's a tidy group of Brussels Sprouts growing at an allotment here at ~ Sway ~ .

The upturned plastic bottles are on the canes to prevent eye injury, something that happens all too easily when you're gardening.

An Allotment is a piece of land that can be rented quite cheaply from the local council. They were intended to be used by people who didn't have gardens, so they had somewhere to grow their own vegetables. People can choose what they grow these days, and some people will grow quite a lot of flowers and even small fruit trees, if permitted by local regulations.

Allotments are measured using the old standard of 'rods', a full sized allotment is something in the regions of 10 rods in length and one or two rods wide.

A rod is about 5 1/2 yards, so it's a sizeable patch of land to look after. Here's a piece with informations about ~ Anglo Saxon weights and measures ~

Here is a Wikipedia article about ~ Allotments ~ . Sadly these are much under threat these days and allotment holders are being evicted so that the land can be used for housing.

At the 'lottie'

Here's a tidy group of Brussels Sprouts growing at an allotment here at ~ Sway ~ .

The upturned plastic bottles are on the canes to prevent eye injury, something that happens all too easily when you're gardening.

An Allotment is a piece of land that can be rented quite cheaply from the local council. They were intended to be used by people who didn't have gardens, so they had somewhere to grow their own vegetables. People can choose what they grow these days, and some people will grow quite a lot of flowers and even small fruit trees, if permitted by local regulations.

Allotments are measured using the old standard of 'rods', a full sized allotment is something in the regions of 10 rods in length and one or two rods wide.

A rod is about 5 1/2 yards, so it's a sizeable patch of land to look after. Here's a piece with informations about ~ Anglo Saxon weights and measures ~

Here is a Wikipedia article about ~ Allotments ~ . Sadly these are much under threat these days and allotment holders are being evicted so that the land can be used for housing.

comments (16)

We have similar situations in different cities in Canada called community gardens. I think they're such a wonderful idea for city dwellers.
EJWilkins: They're a very good idea, should be more of them, but we're increasingly short of space within our towns now.
Allotments sound like a wonderful idea and I'm sad to hear that they are under threat. The world is losing open, green space too quickly.

Who knew brussels sprouts would be as nice to look at as they are to eat? smile
EJWilkins: Sometimes I see them for sale 'on the stem' .. but without the big leaves, that'd make an interesting picture too, perhaps?
  • Martin
  • United States
  • 16 Nov 2007, 00:41
Thank you for all the information. We never see anything like that over here.
EJWilkins: Where land is at a premium things like this don't happen, which is a pity because good quality fresh produce can be very expensive. There's also the 'community' aspect, these allotment holders know each other very well, and keep an eye out for each other, which is lovely.
Llaman la atención las botellas de plástico en los palos. De esa forma se consigue espantar a los pájaros para que no estropeen la cosecha!

The plastic bottles call the attention in woods. Of that form one is able to frighten the birds so that they do not spoil the harvest!
EJWilkins: Good point about frightening the birds, I think they hand netting over the bamboo canes to keep the pigeons off the plants.
  • Ginnie
  • United States
  • 16 Nov 2007, 03:38
Martin says we never see anything like this over here but actually, years ago my mother-in-law had an "allotment" in her retirement community in Denver, CO. I don't think it was called that, nor do I think she paid for it. It was part of what was available to her in an area away from her condo.

Anyway, it's a great idea and I LOVE brussel sprouts, so good choice. smile
EJWilkins: That sounds very much like the system they have at St Cross and in many retirement communities ... an area of land each resident can claim and work if that's what they'd like to do. It's a good idea.
I like sprouts too, good to hear you do smile
More it's really good to eat, nice morning shot Ellie !
EJWilkins: Thanks Zeb smile
  • Aussie
  • in a night shift daze
  • 16 Nov 2007, 08:37
You have just answered a question that has been rolling around in my head. On the way to work I pass a market garden and they have lots little plastic buckets over the top of their star pickets and I have always wondered WHY.
In most of the major cities here, they have community gardens where people can go and garden in the group, then the produce is shared and any excess is sold.
EJWilkins: Aha, and I didn't even know you'd asked the question .. how's that for clairvoyance?
It is such a shame these are in decline now, Ellie. When I was a youngster, way back when, and living in the North East, allotments were an important source of fresh vegetables. Lovely photograph, btw. (:o)
EJWilkins: It is a shame, and frankly I don't see the need for them to be used for development, there are plenty of other spaces the councils could use.
  • Tracy
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 16 Nov 2007, 12:04
Its a sign christmas is on it's way, bring on the Brussels.
EJWilkins: Yep *yumm*
Good to see you speaking up for allotments. I dpon't have one, but I think they are a great institution and its sad that they are under threat. Developers are now using (and distorting) 'compact city' and sustainability ideas as an excuse for promoting building on urban greenspace. IUt's not just allotments, but large back gardens, common land, recreation grounds etc that are under threat.
EJWilkins: I was saddened by the decision to build part of the Olympic park on allotments, claiming they'd get the land back afterwards, or something, but it's so unlikely to happen. They're an intrinsic part of some communities, and the soil is superb having been cultivated for many generations. A tragedy when bulldozers move in and all for a quick profit!
And you must love brussle sprouts!!!. Thanks for the insight into your gardening. Well done .. it all looks so healthy
EJWilkins: Oh heavens, these aren't mine although I wish they were. The veg we tried to grow tends to be eaten by either slugs or pigeons long before we get the chance to have our share so I'm afraid we gave up.
These allotments are beautifully maintained though, and the people who own them don't mind me wandering round with my camera every now and then. If I'm lucky I get to bring something tasty home with me. smile
Could this be the start of the Christmas themed photos? Actually, its a good photo making this ordinary vet look very ornamental.
(For those who don't know, brussels sprouts are a traditional part of English Christmas dinner.)
EJWilkins: Crikey no! Not yet, not for me at least! But yes, we do enjoy sprouts, and not just at Christmas wink
  • Chris
  • Lost in space!
  • 16 Nov 2007, 15:37
Mmmmm, stirred fried with some spring onions smile
EJWilkins: Sounds tasty smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 16 Nov 2007, 19:06
So the bottles keep the sticks from the eyes, but what are the sticks for?

I have seen this concept in some more countries.
EJWilkins: The canes are there to support netting, for when the plants are small and the pigeons are hungry ... they'd eat the lot in a single sitting.
The humble sprout. What would Christmas be without it? You do the plants Ellie and I'll do the sheds smile
EJWilkins: Did Terry Wogan say the sprouts should be on the boil now, or is it in a week or so? wink ... Have you tried them with chopped chestnuts mixed in? Delicious.
No sheds at these lotties, so I'll let you carry on with the super ones you've got
Very unusual and interesting picture. I like the angle. Thanks for explanations
EJWilkins: Thanks Richard, glad you liked both the picture and the info.

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