E.J.Wilkins

30 Jan 2008 674 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Sika Deer

Sika Deer


Family Group


Last Sunday, when we went for a walk in the New Forest near Beaulieu, we saw a group of Sika Deer. (*edit 01/02/08 - At first incorrectly identified as Red Deer) It's the first time I've ever seen these deer in the wild. We were able to watch them for a few minutes until they caught our scent.

I'm indulging myself this week and will be posting a picture of these beautiful animals each day until Saturday. All the pictures were taken with my Olympus E-400 and the 'kit' 40-150 mm lens.

Here's the same part of the group as yesterday, they were beginning to move slowly away, they weren't panicking.

The trees, including the dead one in the left foreground, are Oak. Fallen wood isn't collected and tidied away as part of Forest management, it's left to lie because it's an essential part of the woodland ecosystem, providing homes for insects and fungi; as the timber decays nutrients pass back into the soil.

...........

Plentyog has a superb picture of Red Deer
http://plentyog.shutterchance.com/photoblog/Deer_Herd,_Margam_Park_/

.

Sika Deer


Family Group


Last Sunday, when we went for a walk in the New Forest near Beaulieu, we saw a group of Sika Deer. (*edit 01/02/08 - At first incorrectly identified as Red Deer) It's the first time I've ever seen these deer in the wild. We were able to watch them for a few minutes until they caught our scent.

I'm indulging myself this week and will be posting a picture of these beautiful animals each day until Saturday. All the pictures were taken with my Olympus E-400 and the 'kit' 40-150 mm lens.

Here's the same part of the group as yesterday, they were beginning to move slowly away, they weren't panicking.

The trees, including the dead one in the left foreground, are Oak. Fallen wood isn't collected and tidied away as part of Forest management, it's left to lie because it's an essential part of the woodland ecosystem, providing homes for insects and fungi; as the timber decays nutrients pass back into the soil.

...........

Plentyog has a superb picture of Red Deer
http://plentyog.shutterchance.com/photoblog/Deer_Herd,_Margam_Park_/

.

comments (21)

  • Chris Phillips
  • 30 Jan 2008, 00:29
They're keeping a wary eye on the photographer!
EJWilkins: .. and family, and tripod wink
  • Martin
  • United States
  • 30 Jan 2008, 00:46
It looks very much like your cover is blown smile Presumably this is just moments before they all go running off.
EJWilkins: Yes, they've spotted us, you'll have to wait and see what happens next.
Plentyog had a gorgeous picture of deer yesterday, more today too smile
http://plentyog.shutterchance.com/photoblog/Deer_Herd,_Margam_Park_/
  • Astrid
  • The Nehterlands
  • 30 Jan 2008, 05:56
YEP now theve seen you, this still is a very nice balanced shot, in spite of your enthousiasme, great job here!
EJWilkins: I did crop it a bit, to frame it with trees, everything else is almost as it was when we saw the deer.
  • Jewlya
  • United States
  • 30 Jan 2008, 06:07
Lovely, warm tones.
  • Kathryn
  • Germany
  • 30 Jan 2008, 06:59
Like a scene from a movie. They look as if they are ready to dash!
EJWilkins: Ah - the question is - did they? wink
  • Richa
  • United States
  • 30 Jan 2008, 07:06
Great shot again Ellie..
  • Russ
  • 30 Jan 2008, 07:41
Love the picture Ellie, beautiful part of the country, I love the details on the various trees
EJWilkins: It is a very beautiful part of the country - England's newest National Park. smile
Ellie I'm hanging on here for dear life. ;-) richard
EJWilkins: Now you say that Richard this picture makes me think the same - and I know what happened next! wink
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 30 Jan 2008, 09:14
Wonderful photo love the colours cant believe how well feed they look for deers in the wild
EJWilkins: Well, they've been living in the area for a few thousand years so they know how to make the best of it, I suppose the same as your kangaroos do. They've also got their thicker winter coats, same as the ponies. smile
Another superb one Ellie. Well done
  • Ginnie
  • United States
  • 30 Jan 2008, 09:22
I love how they're so inquisitive, Ellie. The lighting is wonderful. This is a sanctuary for them AND for all the other critters who benefit from this ecological heaven.
EJWilkins: Lovely, lovely sunshine. Without it we wouldn't have gone for the walk - and we wouldn't have seen the deer.
Now you know what sort of place we go walking, it's either here or the coast. I'll have to share some more Forest pictures some time - of the heathland smile
  • ray
  • Thailand
  • 30 Jan 2008, 13:45
More...please!
EJWilkins: OK smile
There's one a day including Saturday. After that there are a few more that I'll slot in 'as and when'.
Certainly beats half-gill measures and ornamental shoes!! wink Lovely shot- I can see you'll be wanting a 2x converter next!
EJWilkins: You'll have mail!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 30 Jan 2008, 15:33
Great group - have your tried closer crops - e.g. a thin picture?

All around the border it seems as if there is light seeping in. Do you have any idea?
EJWilkins: I put a fine white border round the edge, doesn't seemed to have worked particularly well. I tried all sorts of crops and ended up leaving it as a high rectangle because I've never shared views of the Forest 'proper', but yes, this would stand cropping to a letterbox shape, so would the previous two. See what you think about tomorrows wink
  • Pops
  • United Kingdom
  • 30 Jan 2008, 17:17
You really got their attention in this one. Nice and sharp throughout as well.
  • Kay
  • my desk at work
  • 30 Jan 2008, 21:11
Lovely deer, Ellie. I like how the trees hold the picture together. The deer are well protected underneath wink These deer look very well fed.
EJWilkins: Phew, somebody noticed smile I cropped in to make a tree border, it seemed to finish the picture nicely. Thanks Kay
  • Tracy
  • Stoke on Trent UK
  • 30 Jan 2008, 22:27
Love the white tuft on the bums reminds me of rabbits.
These are lovely pictures Elliesmile
EJWilkins: Thank you so much Tracy, it's these white tufts that helped me with the identification. You'll see more of them smile
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 30 Jan 2008, 23:51
Fantastic shot Ellie, love all the big trees in the background
EJWilkins: This is 'native' woodland. The biggest oaks are possibly four hundred years old. Parts of the Forest are also used as Forestry. Some areas were planted up with Oaks after Nelson appealed to Parliament, the country wasn't replacing the trees that had been felled for shipbuilding, those areas have trees in rows, which looks so unusual.
"Inclosures" keep out the ponies, but not the deer. Some of these are now being replanted with native trees rather than conifers.
Awesome! I like this!
  • Ron S
  • Worcester UK
  • 31 Jan 2008, 21:27
Now I see the challenges that wildlife photographers have to face!
This one is even a bit funny ! The expression are very nice !

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera E-400
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/50s
aperture f/5.6
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 150.0mm
Tallinn MemorialTallinn Memorial
Sika DeerSika Deer
Sika DeerSika Deer

Warning