E.J.Wilkins

28 May 2008 1,065 views
 
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photoblog image Winchester

Winchester


Guildhall

... at 4.55 p.m.


Not satisfied with making sure the city's inhabitants could work out their own weather forecast using the equipment I showed yesterday, the Victorian architects made sure the locals also knew the time of day.

Even now this is one of the tallest buildings in the city, except for the Cathedral, so the clock can still be seen from some distance. It chimes too, which is handy if you're out of sight.

If you look very carefully you should be able to see another pointed spire in the lower right third of this picture, this is a spire/clock tower on the new Hampshire County Council offices.

In the foreground is a Zebra Crossing, with its position marked by Belisha Beacons. These are 'unregulated' crossings, if a pedestrian is on the crossing traffic is supposed to stop.

The orange beacons on striped poles were introduced by transport minister Leslie Hore-Belisha in 1934. The striped road markings came later, following complaints from motorists that the crossings weren't always easy to see. The flashing lights came along in 1953, amid fears that they would distract motorists.

Loads more to read on this site  - Histories - Pedestrian Crossings -

.....

This picture is level, although there is some distortion from the lens. The road in the foreground has quite a crown/camber, to make sure rainwater drains into the gutters and away into the drains. The pavement also slopes slightly towards the edge of the road for the same reason. Also, as you can see - here - on this aerial view, the building is in two parts, with the further section at an angle to the section at this end (front of picture).
.

Winchester


Guildhall

... at 4.55 p.m.


Not satisfied with making sure the city's inhabitants could work out their own weather forecast using the equipment I showed yesterday, the Victorian architects made sure the locals also knew the time of day.

Even now this is one of the tallest buildings in the city, except for the Cathedral, so the clock can still be seen from some distance. It chimes too, which is handy if you're out of sight.

If you look very carefully you should be able to see another pointed spire in the lower right third of this picture, this is a spire/clock tower on the new Hampshire County Council offices.

In the foreground is a Zebra Crossing, with its position marked by Belisha Beacons. These are 'unregulated' crossings, if a pedestrian is on the crossing traffic is supposed to stop.

The orange beacons on striped poles were introduced by transport minister Leslie Hore-Belisha in 1934. The striped road markings came later, following complaints from motorists that the crossings weren't always easy to see. The flashing lights came along in 1953, amid fears that they would distract motorists.

Loads more to read on this site  - Histories - Pedestrian Crossings -

.....

This picture is level, although there is some distortion from the lens. The road in the foreground has quite a crown/camber, to make sure rainwater drains into the gutters and away into the drains. The pavement also slopes slightly towards the edge of the road for the same reason. Also, as you can see - here - on this aerial view, the building is in two parts, with the further section at an angle to the section at this end (front of picture).
.

comments (24)

No excuses for being late in this town. Lovely view of the architectural details and the pedestrian activity.
EJWilkins: That's probably why they built the clock tower ;
0
You are an erudite person Ellie - as well as being a very good photgrapher. What better lighting could there be for a street scene than this, with its wonderful silvery sky. I always think diffused light is so much better than full sunlight for outdoor shots
EJWilkins: Eh? Erudite? Gimme a dictionary!
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States right now
  • 28 May 2008, 02:28
I am such a glutton for clock towers like this, Ellie, as you know by now. When this page first opened, I immediately thougth of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. It has those lovely tower angles. And I agree with Chris about diffused light. I can feel this place!
EJWilkins: I was sure you'd like this one Ginnie. Do you think architects shared ideas, same as they do now, because this is very much a style of its time.
You'd adore Winchester Ginnie smile
  • ray
  • Thailand
  • 28 May 2008, 02:36
Ha Ha!
There are zebra crossings in Bangkok...but no zebras.

There is only one fundamental roadlaw in infamously congested Bangkok...

"Larger vehicles shall have right of way over smaller vehicles"

...only dogs, cats and rats give way to humans on zebra crossings.
EJWilkins: grin
Funny, in some towns here there are still zebra crossings that work properly, this is one of them. In others they've had to be replaced with noisy things that speak and whistle at pedestrians in case they can't see the lights, and have traffic stop lights to try to make drivers stop - doesn't always work out that way though.
  • kay
  • portland metro area
  • 28 May 2008, 03:07
Interesting history on the pedestrian crossings. Wonder what it was like before cars were invented!

This is a wonderful photograph, Ellie. I love the architecture. What a beautiful city.
EJWilkins: Before cars were invented they employed children to keep a crossing place clear of horse droppings.
  • iain
  • 28 May 2008, 04:13
Sorry for vanishing for so long Ellie! It's been crazy busy!

I love the stormy-day look. What beautiful architecture too. I love the tones and yellows in the photo smile
EJWilkins: Good to see you back Iain, I hope you're getting some r + r time in amongst all that work.
Weather here is dreadful, rain and floods. Yuk.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 28 May 2008, 07:39
Great photo and lots of good info,thanks Ellie
EJWilkins: That's OK, I enjoyed finding out a bit more for myself too smile
I like how you have composed this urban scene, Ellie.!
EJWilkins: Thank you Jose. smile
Very nice shot Ellie.I like the lighting. No doubt, it's 4.55 pm!
EJWilkins: Not according to Chad, he says it's 4:56 wink
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 28 May 2008, 10:35
In China Zebra crossings appear to be mere suggestions that it may be a safe place to try and cross.
Lovely capture Ellie.
EJWilkins: It's the same in some towns here too, which is why a lot are being replaced by noisy stop signals.
Looks like something happening further down the street - lots of people.
EJWilkins: The street is pedestrianised further along, also on the day I took this picture there were a number of fund-raising events, so a lot of people about.
  • Les Auld
  • A wet Southport
  • 28 May 2008, 10:51
A traditional Victorian building with all the details one would expect. Well seen Ellie.
EJWilkins: They're distinctive aren't they, always the same sort of features. Well built too, in general.
Its like a soft sculpture, with a squidgy pavement, bendy verticals and the main bent building- even the man on the left is bendy!! wink I wish I had your cloudy weather here!
EJWilkins: You're welcome to the cloudy weather David, and the rain, and the local flooding, and the train cancellations!
I had a go at sorting the converging verticals, but it looked awful, too many of the buildings are too old and simply aren't vertical, so they wouldn't behave. Hadn't noticed how the man appeared to be bendy, I wish I knew what he was carrying.
  • Astrid
  • The Netherlands
  • 28 May 2008, 11:57
So sharp, so nice such a nice building, thank you so much for your story with it, you did a very well job here.
EJWilkins: Thanks Astrid smile
I like this shot, but it would be interesting to see a mild HDR conversion of it?
EJWilkins: Err, I wouldn't know where to start, but I think you're right. It's "that" sort of sky. If you'd like to try I'll see if I can email you a copy of the original. Let me know smile
  • Karima
  • Washington DC
  • 28 May 2008, 15:32
I love images like this that give a sense of time (pun intended) and place. Agree on the lovely diffused lighting (no harshness here). And your description adds so much dimension to viewing the image.
EJWilkins: Thanks Karina, it's a lovely old town, that hasn't been too ruined by development.
  • Martin
  • United States
  • 28 May 2008, 16:22
The Victorians certainly did a good job with useful architecture. Interesting background information about pedestrian crossings. I never gave them any thought, but of course nobody ever walks around here smile
EJWilkins: Doesn't anybody walk anywhere?
  • Sheila
  • Spain mostly, England a little
  • 28 May 2008, 16:43
I have never been to Winchester - are there more buildings like this and the cathedral? When I look at pictures like this it makes me feel that next time I am England I should do a bit of touring to new places. Lovely picture, Ellie.
EJWilkins: It's an old city so there are a lot of old buildings, some mixed in amongst newer ones. There's the Great Hall and part of the old castle too, as well as garrison buildings - actually quite a lot to see.
I'll try to show some more, but last time I was there I was free at the end of the day, and didn't have much time before the light went. I'll have to go back. smile
  • chad
  • In front of a computer
  • 28 May 2008, 17:14
It looks like 4.56 to me, Ellie.
EJWilkins: grin Trust you!
  • mal
  • 28 May 2008, 18:14
lol at Chad.

My mother has connections with Winchester, never been myself. mal
EJWilkins: Really? It's a lovely city, not too big and quite 'comfy'. Not sure which I prefer though, here or Chester.
Nobody builds civic buildings like the Victorians. Love it Ellie
EJWilkins: That's true, and somehow many of them have stood the test of time because they were well built, unlike some of the hovels that sprung up at the same time, when they were building houses like crazy. Parallels with "today" somehow, aren't there?
  • brianaw
  • Leicestershire, on a rainy evening!
  • 28 May 2008, 21:39
Lots of interesting information again Ellie together with a very good photo. What a majestic building. I bet it is just as grand inside.
EJWilkins: I've never been inside, but I can imagine it's quite 'something'
  • Alan
  • Southampton.. sunny south coast of England
  • 30 May 2008, 21:43
I like the way the yto pof the Guildhall really seems t otower over the rest of the buildings.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 30 May 2008, 23:50
Hah, to think that even pedestrian crossings have history. I never thought of that.

Great sharp picture. The buildings on both sides are slanting inwards. It is my experience with my 18-200 lens, that if I tried too wide an angle the slanting happens. With lens zoomed to around 50mm the slanting is not there.

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