E.J.Wilkins

12 Oct 2008 632 views
 
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photoblog image St Michael and All Angels, Linton in Craven

St Michael and All Angels, Linton in Craven



George III Coat of Arms

This picture shows a Royal Coat of Arms for George III.

It's the sort of thing we don't tend to associate with a church, but this is the second one of these I've seen this year - the other was in St Mary's, Silchester.

The story behind this one is quite interesting. My information comes from a picture I took at the time of the information shown within the smaller frame on the right. It's - here - Luckily while we were at the church somebody was on hand to tell us a little more.

The coat of Arms is painted on oak. It was discovered when a vestments cupboard in the vestry was removed during extension work in 1994/5. What the workers originally saw were some fine oak boards that they thought could be used for various DIY projects of their own, rather than sending the wood off to landfill. When the panel was removed this wonderful work was discovered.

During the Commonwealth Cromwell decreed that his Coat of Arms should be displayed in all churches, it had to visible to all the congregation when they were looking towards the altar. Perhaps it was a reminder of his power and importance. Whether it was to suggest that he had more power than the Church, I really don't know.

But, as a means of passing on information it was a good one. Everybody went to Church, information - both local and national - was passed onto the population through the clergy. There was no television or radio, and newspapers were not produced until the reign of Queen Anne in 1702 - but the majority of the population was illiterate until the latter part of 19th century so relied on word of mouth.

On the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, a decree from King Charles II stated that these Cromwellian artefacts should be removed and the Royal Coat of Arms displayed instead. Again, I'm sure this was to indicate his authority, and also to let people know who was King and what the Royal Coat of Arms looked like, so they could recognise it if need be.

The tradition continued, in Linton, until at least 1801-1816 when this one was painted. It is believed that it was removed during the reign of Queen Victoria - possibly during renovations in 1862. There is no evidence of there being any later Coat of Arms on display in the church.

The church was fortunate enough to get a grant from Yorkshire Dales National Park to restore this, and it's now proudly displayed - as you can see.

You can see more information - here -
A little more about the church - here -
Linton is - here -
.

St Michael and All Angels, Linton in Craven



George III Coat of Arms

This picture shows a Royal Coat of Arms for George III.

It's the sort of thing we don't tend to associate with a church, but this is the second one of these I've seen this year - the other was in St Mary's, Silchester.

The story behind this one is quite interesting. My information comes from a picture I took at the time of the information shown within the smaller frame on the right. It's - here - Luckily while we were at the church somebody was on hand to tell us a little more.

The coat of Arms is painted on oak. It was discovered when a vestments cupboard in the vestry was removed during extension work in 1994/5. What the workers originally saw were some fine oak boards that they thought could be used for various DIY projects of their own, rather than sending the wood off to landfill. When the panel was removed this wonderful work was discovered.

During the Commonwealth Cromwell decreed that his Coat of Arms should be displayed in all churches, it had to visible to all the congregation when they were looking towards the altar. Perhaps it was a reminder of his power and importance. Whether it was to suggest that he had more power than the Church, I really don't know.

But, as a means of passing on information it was a good one. Everybody went to Church, information - both local and national - was passed onto the population through the clergy. There was no television or radio, and newspapers were not produced until the reign of Queen Anne in 1702 - but the majority of the population was illiterate until the latter part of 19th century so relied on word of mouth.

On the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, a decree from King Charles II stated that these Cromwellian artefacts should be removed and the Royal Coat of Arms displayed instead. Again, I'm sure this was to indicate his authority, and also to let people know who was King and what the Royal Coat of Arms looked like, so they could recognise it if need be.

The tradition continued, in Linton, until at least 1801-1816 when this one was painted. It is believed that it was removed during the reign of Queen Victoria - possibly during renovations in 1862. There is no evidence of there being any later Coat of Arms on display in the church.

The church was fortunate enough to get a grant from Yorkshire Dales National Park to restore this, and it's now proudly displayed - as you can see.

You can see more information - here -
A little more about the church - here -
Linton is - here -
.

comments (10)

Wonderful picture and some really interesting information. What a lovely find.
EJWilkins: It was a lovely find, and rattle my "history bone" more than I expected too.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 12 Oct 2008, 13:28
very interesting information - a very sharp pic which may make swell the hearts of many British and of mine too, considering the single parts of this heraldic figure: the motto of the most noble Order of Garter (Saint George is its patron), the motto of the British monarchs ("Dieu et mon droit") and the emblems of England (Lion) and Scotland (Unicorn)...- if I were teacher I would explain to my German pupils some essentials of the great history of the United Kingdom while looking at your pic..!
EJWilkins: Things like this are a rather wonderful starting point for research and learning.
Very nice photograph of those arms, Ellie. Shame about the light relection but no doubt it couldn't be helped.
  • FLOOG
  • The valleys of a contented soul
  • 12 Oct 2008, 16:59
Very interesting, I did not konw any of the details prior to reading this.

History was a favoured subject of mine back at school, but the old singular brain cell is not what it used to be!

Excellent smile
Great bit of history there Ellie, and all this from a fine image. Well seen.
  • paul
  • United Kingdom
  • 12 Oct 2008, 18:38
Very interesting Ellie. When were you up in Yorkshire?
Thank you for this very interesting stuff Ellie. I've been to Silchester but I am ashamed to say I did not notice!
Fascination piece of history Ellie. It would have been a great shame had this been lost.
Great composition Ellie, goe sback to the times when warswere fought in the name of religeon, what a great find by the workmen
  • Alan
  • Southampton, but wishing I was elsewhere!
  • 12 Oct 2008, 22:04
I always enjoy your images because they are usually accompanied with interesting information and this is case in point.

I'm up in the Yorkshire Dales for a week over the New Year break so I will look in here.

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