E.J.Wilkins

09 Nov 2008 674 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image The Hospital of St Cross, Winchester

The Hospital of St Cross, Winchester


ALL THESE WERE HONOURED IN THEIR GENERATION AND WERE A GLORY IN THEIR DAYS


Today, Sunday 9th November 2008, is the day when memorial services will be held to remember those who died in military conflict. The date was chosen because it is the nearest Sunday to 11th November, Armistice Day - the day the Great War, later called the First World War, ended.

My picture shows the memorial at St Cross Hospital, near Winchester.

The names here were the men from the village of St Cross who lost their lives in WWI. They are few when we think about the millions who died, but to lose so many men - fathers, husbands, sons - the best of their generation, must have been devastating for such a small community.

I believe this is the first of the many War Memorials that were erected. It was put in place a month before the Armistice, which came into effect at 11 a.m. on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

The bronze sculpture depicts St George overcoming and slaying the evil dragon, it was designed by Sir George Frampton. The window above the memorial was designed by James Powell & Son / Whitefriars glass and shows the figure of Fortitude. The oak reredos of the chapel was designed by Sir Thomas Jackson (see more here within my site and here @ answers.com).

Clearly the people of St Cross did their very best to provide a fitting memorial for those who died in this conflict, that was often called "The War to end all Wars" - a war so terrible that there could never be another.

This pattern was repeated throughout Europe, with costly, carefully designed, memorials erected in memory of those who had given their lives to ensure enduring peace. I'm sure contributions came from the survivors who knew the true horror of the trenches and the gas attacks and who had seen their friends die, it will have given them some solace, I hope.

.....
If you would like to find information relating to a War Memorial near you this site provides a wealth of detail and also links to further sites. http://www.roll-of-honour.com/

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission holds a searchable database. Information held on the site includes the burial place of those who lost their lives.
.....

Named on this memorial are, on the left plaque

G M Clark  Major Hampshire Regt
L C B Russell  Capt. Rifle Brigade
N E Gifford  Capt Leicestershire Regt
J P  Causton Major Hampshire Regt
C C E Clowes  Lieut Kings Royal Rifles
E H S Bligh  Lieut Royal Naval Division
C H Vacher Lieut Warwickshire Regt
A H Newton  Lieut Middlesex Regt
C Jeffery  Petty Officer Royal Navy
P J Berry  Sergeant Kings (????)

I cannot read the right hand plaque clearly from my picture, those details will be added later after I have been back to St Cross again.

The War Memorial Chapel is very small, separated from the choir carved stone screen. The monument is positioned centrally beneath the window on the north wall, it isn't possible to get a view of it from any distance away
.

The Hospital of St Cross, Winchester


ALL THESE WERE HONOURED IN THEIR GENERATION AND WERE A GLORY IN THEIR DAYS


Today, Sunday 9th November 2008, is the day when memorial services will be held to remember those who died in military conflict. The date was chosen because it is the nearest Sunday to 11th November, Armistice Day - the day the Great War, later called the First World War, ended.

My picture shows the memorial at St Cross Hospital, near Winchester.

The names here were the men from the village of St Cross who lost their lives in WWI. They are few when we think about the millions who died, but to lose so many men - fathers, husbands, sons - the best of their generation, must have been devastating for such a small community.

I believe this is the first of the many War Memorials that were erected. It was put in place a month before the Armistice, which came into effect at 11 a.m. on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

The bronze sculpture depicts St George overcoming and slaying the evil dragon, it was designed by Sir George Frampton. The window above the memorial was designed by James Powell & Son / Whitefriars glass and shows the figure of Fortitude. The oak reredos of the chapel was designed by Sir Thomas Jackson (see more here within my site and here @ answers.com).

Clearly the people of St Cross did their very best to provide a fitting memorial for those who died in this conflict, that was often called "The War to end all Wars" - a war so terrible that there could never be another.

This pattern was repeated throughout Europe, with costly, carefully designed, memorials erected in memory of those who had given their lives to ensure enduring peace. I'm sure contributions came from the survivors who knew the true horror of the trenches and the gas attacks and who had seen their friends die, it will have given them some solace, I hope.

.....
If you would like to find information relating to a War Memorial near you this site provides a wealth of detail and also links to further sites. http://www.roll-of-honour.com/

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission holds a searchable database. Information held on the site includes the burial place of those who lost their lives.
.....

Named on this memorial are, on the left plaque

G M Clark  Major Hampshire Regt
L C B Russell  Capt. Rifle Brigade
N E Gifford  Capt Leicestershire Regt
J P  Causton Major Hampshire Regt
C C E Clowes  Lieut Kings Royal Rifles
E H S Bligh  Lieut Royal Naval Division
C H Vacher Lieut Warwickshire Regt
A H Newton  Lieut Middlesex Regt
C Jeffery  Petty Officer Royal Navy
P J Berry  Sergeant Kings (????)

I cannot read the right hand plaque clearly from my picture, those details will be added later after I have been back to St Cross again.

The War Memorial Chapel is very small, separated from the choir carved stone screen. The monument is positioned centrally beneath the window on the north wall, it isn't possible to get a view of it from any distance away
.

comments (13)

This is very touching Ellie: as often these memorials are
EJWilkins: They are aren't they, and somehow get more touching with each year that passes
  • FLOOG
  • The tranquility of a contented soul
  • 9 Nov 2008, 05:13
Well said and presented, Ellie.

The Floogs have a tradition of rememberence, and I think it should more and more be brought to the fore in this country, as newer generations are not being educated in the sacrifice of the few for the freedom of the many.
EJWilkins: We have the same sort of tradition, a little easier perhaps to pursue in this country where Armistice Day is set aside, but not a national holiday - which I believe it should be.
Is your "Veteran's Day" similar?
It has been said that every family if they traced their ancestry would find a relative who died in the great war, such was the scale of the slaughter. We, rightly, honour those who sacrificed their lives, but have failed time and again to learn a better way to resolve conflict.
EJWilkins: Yes, you're right about the family history part.

Right too about the way "they" still haven't learned the lesson of history.
  • Alan
  • Southampton, on the sunny south coast of England.
  • 9 Nov 2008, 09:02
A very fitting tribute, Ellie. So sad when so many from a small village gave their lives for the country.
EJWilkins: Thanks Alan.
I take it you've seen that So'ton City Council is saying it won't pay to restore the memorial, that was originally in London
http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/3796941.No_cash_to_save_threatened_memorial/
They wanted to remove it as "unsafe" a year or so ago, but didn't manage to achieve it.
Very nice tribute Ellie. This image is perfect!
EJWilkins: Thank you Richard.
As last year, you too, remember. Lovely tribute Ellie
EJWilkins: Thanks Jose, I see you also remembered with a beautiful picture today smile
Well done and interresting once again !
EJWilkins: Thanks Zeb
  • Frida
  • Sweden
  • 9 Nov 2008, 15:35
An interesting story and a nice picture with it.
EJWilkins: Thank you Frida
  • Kay
  • United States
  • 9 Nov 2008, 16:59
Thank you for all your information about WWII and those who lost their life for their country.

I'll never forget. My Dad is my hero, along with others who fought by his side - no matter which country they came from.

Thanks, Ellie. I love the picture, so poignant and thoughtful.
EJWilkins: Thanks Kay. When you see the list of names, knowing how their families must have grieved and, sadly, how little respect the military now have here in UK it makes it even more poignant.
Very interesting Ellie. Nice shot
EJWilkins: Thanks ALbert
  • Alan
  • Southampton, on the sunny south coast of England
  • 9 Nov 2008, 22:17
Thanks for the link to the article in the Daily Echo, Ellie. It beggars belief that the Councl can't find this money considering on how much they waste on needless pavement "improvements"; you seen London Road and the road at the northern side of the Art Gallery? The new Council seems just as bad as the lost lot!!!
EJWilkins: To be honest, their attitude disgusts me, they've been itching to get rid of the memorial for several years. It has to be one individual rather than the elected officials who don't have much say in what goes on.
Good photo tribute, Ellie!
EJWilkins: Thank you Jose Angel
What a beautiful memorial Ellie, we all need to remember what these are for from time to time.
EJWilkins: It is beautiful isn't it, so much effort too.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera E-400
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/2s
aperture f/5.0
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 15.0mm
Tallinn MemorialTallinn Memorial
St Nicholas Church, BrockenhurstSt Nicholas Chur...
Hampshire and Isle of Wight Air AmbulanceHampshire and Is...

Warning