E.J.Wilkins

10 Nov 2008 848 views
 
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photoblog image St Nicholas Church, Brockenhurst

St Nicholas Church, Brockenhurst


New Zealand Commonwealth War Cemetery

THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE


Tucked away in St Nicholas's churchyard in Brockenhurst  are these immaculately maintained graves of soldiers who lost their lives as a result of military action in WWI. This picture was taken on a sunless, overcast, day in early Spring.

There are a 94 ANZAC (Australia and New Zealand Army Corps) and 3 Indian men buried here as well as British and other Commonwealth soldiers and members of the Royal Defence Corps. Most lie thousands of miles from their homes. They are not lonely in this place because each day will see people, some local, some from further afield, visiting this resting place among the trees.

Tomorrow, Tuesday 11th November 2008, in cities, towns and villages throughout the United Kingdom, there will be a two minutes silence beginning at 11:00 a.m., to mark the exact moment World War One ended.

There will be a short service here in Brockenhurst for those who are able to attend, to remember these men. It will not be as grand as the one held on Sunday, there will be fewer people attending, but be assured that these men's sacrifice will be remembered on the anniversary of the Armistice.
.....

The men were brought to Brockenhurst because they were wounded, they were tended in the "N1 NZ General Hospital" not far from the church where 21,004 were treated for their wounds.
.....

The words engraved on the cenotaph were chosen by Rudyard Kipling as part of his work for the "Imperial War Graves Commission" (now "Commonwealth War Graves Commission"). He also suggested "Known unto God" be written on the headstones of unknown servicemen.
.....

The names of each military burial and a picture of each headstone are on http://www.southernlife.org.uk/newzelan.htm

More information is held on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site.
.....

You may notice the single non-standard stone. This is what it says

THIS STONE
WAS ERECTED BY
PARISHIONERS OF BROCKENHURST
TO MARK THE SPOT WHERE IS LAID
THE EARTHLY BODY OF
SUKHA
A RESIDENT OF MOHULLA GUNGAPUR
CITY, BARIELLY, UNITED PROVINCES OF INDIA
HE LEFT COUNTRY, HOME AND FRIENDS TO SERVE OUR KING AND EMPIRE
IN THE GREAT EUROPEAN WAR
AS A HUMBLE SERVANT IN THE LADY HARDINGE HOSPITAL FOR WOUNDED INDIAN SOLDIERS IN THIS PARISH
HE DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON JANUARY 12TH 1915 AGED 30 YEARS
BY CREED HE WAS NOT A "CHRISTIAN"
BUT HIS EARTHLY LIFE WAS SACRIFICED IN THE INTERESTS OF OTHERS.

"There is one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all"
Ephesians IV.6

.

St Nicholas Church, Brockenhurst


New Zealand Commonwealth War Cemetery

THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE


Tucked away in St Nicholas's churchyard in Brockenhurst  are these immaculately maintained graves of soldiers who lost their lives as a result of military action in WWI. This picture was taken on a sunless, overcast, day in early Spring.

There are a 94 ANZAC (Australia and New Zealand Army Corps) and 3 Indian men buried here as well as British and other Commonwealth soldiers and members of the Royal Defence Corps. Most lie thousands of miles from their homes. They are not lonely in this place because each day will see people, some local, some from further afield, visiting this resting place among the trees.

Tomorrow, Tuesday 11th November 2008, in cities, towns and villages throughout the United Kingdom, there will be a two minutes silence beginning at 11:00 a.m., to mark the exact moment World War One ended.

There will be a short service here in Brockenhurst for those who are able to attend, to remember these men. It will not be as grand as the one held on Sunday, there will be fewer people attending, but be assured that these men's sacrifice will be remembered on the anniversary of the Armistice.
.....

The men were brought to Brockenhurst because they were wounded, they were tended in the "N1 NZ General Hospital" not far from the church where 21,004 were treated for their wounds.
.....

The words engraved on the cenotaph were chosen by Rudyard Kipling as part of his work for the "Imperial War Graves Commission" (now "Commonwealth War Graves Commission"). He also suggested "Known unto God" be written on the headstones of unknown servicemen.
.....

The names of each military burial and a picture of each headstone are on http://www.southernlife.org.uk/newzelan.htm

More information is held on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site.
.....

You may notice the single non-standard stone. This is what it says

THIS STONE
WAS ERECTED BY
PARISHIONERS OF BROCKENHURST
TO MARK THE SPOT WHERE IS LAID
THE EARTHLY BODY OF
SUKHA
A RESIDENT OF MOHULLA GUNGAPUR
CITY, BARIELLY, UNITED PROVINCES OF INDIA
HE LEFT COUNTRY, HOME AND FRIENDS TO SERVE OUR KING AND EMPIRE
IN THE GREAT EUROPEAN WAR
AS A HUMBLE SERVANT IN THE LADY HARDINGE HOSPITAL FOR WOUNDED INDIAN SOLDIERS IN THIS PARISH
HE DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON JANUARY 12TH 1915 AGED 30 YEARS
BY CREED HE WAS NOT A "CHRISTIAN"
BUT HIS EARTHLY LIFE WAS SACRIFICED IN THE INTERESTS OF OTHERS.

"There is one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all"
Ephesians IV.6

.

comments (26)

  • Kay
  • United States
  • 10 Nov 2008, 00:45
Very touching tribute, Ellie. I will be thinking of this photo and the meaning of your words on Armistice Day. Thank you.

BTW, I think the weather, the angle and the lighting is perfect for this photograph. It really brings it home.
EJWilkins: I've been back many times, but that day with the dull light seemed to produce the most fitting pictures.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 10 Nov 2008, 00:57
Ellie this very good photo of a sad setting.The words on Sukha head stone are very interesting for then and now
EJWilkins: The words show more than the people could have imagined at the time, I think
I know Brockenhurst Ellie but didn't know of this cemetery. But these things are dotted around all over the place. There's one in the Cotswolds in a most remote location
EJWilkins: It's in the graveyard of St Nicholas Church, which is beautiful in itself, and not in the centre of the village
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 10 Nov 2008, 02:35
This image has special significance to me, Ellie, because of celebrating ANZAC Day in Brisbane, Australia, this past April 25th. I'll never forget it.
EJWilkins: Yes, a poignant occasion Ginnie, one that's marked here too with a very special ceremony when the local children place a tribute on each of the graves.
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 10 Nov 2008, 03:03
You have captured this beautifully. Lovely inscription in memory of Sukha.
EJWilkins: Thanks Aussie, the inscription too is, I think quite special.
Thank you Ellie for sharing that with us. the photo captures it all. While over in Belgium on a motorcycle holiday a numberof us went and visited various war graves, from the pristine American cemetries to the almost forgottten German ones. We also visited Yeppes, (have prbably spelt that wrong), you cannot start to imagine what these people went through for us, lest we forget.
EJWilkins: I'm surprised by what you say. In Hollybrook, Southampton, there are German graves that are as well tended as the British ones. I can't imagine what it must have been like for either the men or their families, whoever they were fighting for, although I try to learn as much as I can.
  • Martin
  • United States
  • 10 Nov 2008, 03:51
The muted tones fit the setting perfectly.
EJWilkins: Thank you, that's what I thought too
That inscription is very moving Ellie. It is unlikely that, in those days, his family was ever able to visit and see this tribute. I hope they at least knew that he had been properly honoured.
EJWilkins: I hope, perhaps, that his descendants or family will know of it. I believe there was a local campaign for his memorial to be special, something that CWGC might not permit even today
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 Nov 2008, 08:58
The saddest thing is that we do collectively forget - I can only hope that nothing like this ever happens again.
EJWilkins: Perhaps Mike, but reports suggest that more people are buying poppies and more people are attending Remembrance services, so there is hope.
  • Tracy
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 10 Nov 2008, 09:17
Very sad Ellie.
Your image captures that atmosphere and brings a tear.
EJWilkins: It is sad, I'm glad I've been able to show some of my feelings too.
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 Nov 2008, 09:30
A very poignant picture, Ellie. The fact that the graves are so immaculately tended makes it even more so. We should never forget.
Ingrid
EJWilkins: The man who takes care of them is truly dedicated to his task, he does a brilliant job of not only keeping this area up to CWGC standards but the rest of the graveyard is calm and peaceful too.
I am always deeply touched when I visit these cemeteries.
Fine image Ellie.
EJWilkins: They make me stop and think too Richard.
The background and lighting is just right for this picture, Ellie. Very moving.
EJWilkins: I thought so too Sheila, thank you
I was drawn to the uniform flowers marking each grave, Ellie, and touched by the tribute to SUKHA. It makes this visit a learning and inspirational experience. Thank you.
I was drawn to the uniform flowers marking each grave, Ellie, and touched by the tribute to SUKHA. It makes this visit a learning and inspirational experience. Thank you.
EJWilkins: The daffodils are "non-standard" but suit the area perfectly. Other plants are from Australia and New Zealand - flaxes and so on - because that's the way CWGC works.
  • FLOOG
  • The tranquility of a contented soul
  • 10 Nov 2008, 14:18
Perfect, Ellie
EJWilkins: Thanks
  • Frida
  • Sweden
  • 10 Nov 2008, 14:44
Very good composition together with colours and light makes this a beautiful image. And an interesting story to go with it.
EJWilkins: Thank you Frida
I like to read your explanations
EJWilkins: Thank you Albert. Sometimes I find it hard just to have a picture, especially when there's a story to tell
A good follow up to your DSunday picture Ellie, much in the same vein as the one I have put on for tomorrow (Tuesday).
EJWilkins: I have a slightly different one for tomorrow. I think it's important to, if you like, "do my bit" for these men. They gave everything for me and mine.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 10 Nov 2008, 17:25
Yesterday and today you remember of the deads "as a result of military action in WWI"- important and rather unusual on photoblogs is the motif and impressive is the kind of your posting: very exact informations are given, names were mentioned- in a very dignified way you honour the deads! - I have a personal reference to that motif: My German grandfather has died (36) in Aleppo 1918 as reverend and interpreter (no volunteer!) during the WWI (against Brits/Lawrence of Arabia) having suffered by a pneumonia after a long march through the desert. He found his grave in the desert, but in a book being open to inspection his name is mentioned. My mother can hardly remember her father, my grandmother became as doctor an emancipated woman in order to care for the whole family. Only one fate of many fates caused by the WWI!
EJWilkins: I hope you are able to trace your grandfather's resting place Philine, it was a terrible time for so many people. They were brave men.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 10 Nov 2008, 18:11
This kind of picture always sets me thinking. Although I have no-one specific to remember in WW1 context, I am interested in history and am aware of the horrors of the so-called trench warfare.

I still believe that the best cure for war would be to wait until after the war and then string up all the politicians who were in charge at the outbreak by their ganookies. That should apply to the politicians of all warring nations.
EJWilkins: It worked then, if it made you think. I hope other people who might chance across it will do the same.
Not sure if your idea would work though wink
Wonderful tribute, beautifully photographed, Ellie. (:o)
EJWilkins: Thanks Ros, it's one of hundreds of pictures I've taken in this cemetery. You should go there, the whole place is beautiful.
  • Alan
  • Alongside the Severn, Ironbridge
  • 10 Nov 2008, 21:23
It's an eductaion viewing your images, Ellie. I never knew this was at the church; fascinating. I found out that there is a Belgium cemetery and some war graves on Southampton Common last week; never seen that before either.
EJWilkins: Yes, the Belgian Memorial in Southampton is quite important, not least because some of the badges on the graves are pre-standard design. The Old Cemetery is a rather important place, I think.
  • Martie
  • United States
  • 10 Nov 2008, 23:17
Beautiful composition - love the angle here. The grounds and stones are wonderfully maintained!
EJWilkins: They're beautifully maintained by a very dedicated man who has responsibility for the whole churchyard, not just this area which is controlled by CWGC.
Another good touching tribute, Ellie!
  • Les Auld
  • United Kingdom
  • 11 Nov 2008, 00:02
A fine tribute Ellie, well seen.

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