E.J.Wilkins

13 Nov 2008 879 views
 
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photoblog image Romsey

Romsey


Temple Buildings 1820

This picture shows a small part of a large and complex group of buildings with roofs at different heights and angles showing it has been added to over time.

It is unusual to see copper used in cladding, as a ridge capping, for flashing and as an outer for chimney pots because it is expensive. It is also unusual to see what appears to be a Templar motif on a building close to an Abbey that has no apparent link with the Templars, it seems to be a red herring.

Despite searching online I can't find any information about these buildings. My best guess is that they may be a group of almshouses named after the Mount Temple family who lived at Broadlands from 1736, or this might simply be an addition to a much older Abbey building. The date is, I think, when renovations were carried out.

Hopefully a helpful lady from the Abbey will be able to bring an end to my speculation.

update
(12:30hrs 13/11/2008)

The whole of this white terrace was, in the late 18th century and up to 1817, owned by John Latham** a local brewer. He lived in the 2nd and 3rd from the 'town' end of the row of cottages, called at the time "Abbey House". The rest of the site was the brewery. The business went bankrupt in 1817 and the block was bought by the Mount Temple family.

1820 is when the buildings were renovated, possibly on the instruction of  Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston

The copper cladding and the sundial are early 20th century additions, the "Templar" motif probably a play on the surname Temple.

There is no record of any Knights Templar link with Romsey. The Abbey was a Benedictine House, home for upwards of 100 Nuns. The 'Knights Hospitaller of St John of Jerusalem' had a Preceptory at North Baddesley, which is about two and a half miles from Romsey.

(21:09 13/11/2008)
**
National Archives. Held at Hampshire Record Office.

Certificates of qualifications of Justices Q27/3 [n.d.]
Justice John Latham esq.; Property, Abbey House with stables, wash house and brewery with cellars, store-houses and malthouse at Romsey Q27/3/85 1801
.

Romsey


Temple Buildings 1820

This picture shows a small part of a large and complex group of buildings with roofs at different heights and angles showing it has been added to over time.

It is unusual to see copper used in cladding, as a ridge capping, for flashing and as an outer for chimney pots because it is expensive. It is also unusual to see what appears to be a Templar motif on a building close to an Abbey that has no apparent link with the Templars, it seems to be a red herring.

Despite searching online I can't find any information about these buildings. My best guess is that they may be a group of almshouses named after the Mount Temple family who lived at Broadlands from 1736, or this might simply be an addition to a much older Abbey building. The date is, I think, when renovations were carried out.

Hopefully a helpful lady from the Abbey will be able to bring an end to my speculation.

update
(12:30hrs 13/11/2008)

The whole of this white terrace was, in the late 18th century and up to 1817, owned by John Latham** a local brewer. He lived in the 2nd and 3rd from the 'town' end of the row of cottages, called at the time "Abbey House". The rest of the site was the brewery. The business went bankrupt in 1817 and the block was bought by the Mount Temple family.

1820 is when the buildings were renovated, possibly on the instruction of  Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston

The copper cladding and the sundial are early 20th century additions, the "Templar" motif probably a play on the surname Temple.

There is no record of any Knights Templar link with Romsey. The Abbey was a Benedictine House, home for upwards of 100 Nuns. The 'Knights Hospitaller of St John of Jerusalem' had a Preceptory at North Baddesley, which is about two and a half miles from Romsey.

(21:09 13/11/2008)
**
National Archives. Held at Hampshire Record Office.

Certificates of qualifications of Justices Q27/3 [n.d.]
Justice John Latham esq.; Property, Abbey House with stables, wash house and brewery with cellars, store-houses and malthouse at Romsey Q27/3/85 1801
.

comments (26)

  • FLOOG
  • The tranquility of a contented soul
  • 13 Nov 2008, 04:46
Such wonderful architecture. The cladding is most interesting. I love the oampass grass in the foreground, but it's a bit of a pain to look after (you're supposed to burn it back every season!)

A splendid shot and interesting words smile
Lovely picture Ellie: I want to live here!
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 13 Nov 2008, 06:21
Very interestig story and building thank you Ellie good photo by the way.
  • Alan
  • Alongside the Severn, Ironbridge
  • 13 Nov 2008, 06:40
A beautiful photo, Ellie, and your notes make fascinating reading. I do like the architecture here and those windows.. would be a little taxing in uPVC, I feel! I work with a minister who preaches at the Abbey so I'll ask him when I'm back at the Mad House if he knows anything about it. His wife works for the Bishop of WEinchester so there's another link as well.
What a delightful building Ellie. This looks a bit big to have been an almshouse, but I hope you find out more.
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 13 Nov 2008, 08:17
LOOK AT THE SUN DIAL, Ellie! That was the first thing I saw. WOW!
The certain thing is that there is the great history behind these buildings that you have shaped with great detail!
  • BoB
  • Italy
  • 13 Nov 2008, 08:59
nice house, it seems a peaceful place to live in
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 Nov 2008, 09:37
Just the sort of house that most people dream of living in - I wouldn't say no!
Ingrid
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 13 Nov 2008, 09:54
Lovely image Ellie.
good composition
  • Tracy
  • Staffs Moorlands UK
  • 13 Nov 2008, 10:26
Delightful looking place Ellie.
The copper flashing is unusual not sure I have seen that before either.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 Nov 2008, 11:03
Stylish use of copper on the roof - very unusual.
  • Frida
  • Sweden (SWE)
  • 13 Nov 2008, 11:23
Such a lovely house, I love old buildings and often wonder what has happened in them over the years.
Very good light and I like the plants in the foreground.
A very attractive section of the building Ellie, I love the dormer in the roof and the sundial clock. We had one of those Pampas grass things once, a real pain to look after, and even more of a job to dig up.
A very attractive section of the building Ellie, I love the dormer in the roof and the sundial clock. We had one of those Pampas grass things once, a real pain to look after, and even more of a job to dig up.
A fine section of the buildings Ellie, I like the dormer in the roof and the sundial clock.
Really nice part of the whole Ellie, I like the dormer and the sundial clock.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 13 Nov 2008, 13:02
An enchanting, prettily renovated building, wonderfully sun-lit: I like the churchlike windows, the sun-dial, the templars crosses, the verigris, the red flowers behind the roof-window, the reed-grass- in general fine English art as I assume- and- last but not least- your very exact informations including a last update! You are really interested to find out the truth and maybe somebody could help you! The templars- crusaders are known to me- but I think in this case the connection with the Temple family (see yesterday's pic) may be sure indeed!
What a lovely place. I like the serenity coming out of it!
This looks a charming little house, Ellie, and I do like the windows and the clock on the wall. Nice to see a house without replacement windows.
That`s a really interesting cottage, Ellie. The copper cladding is so unusual. I rather like to wander around Romsey....there are some lovely old buildings there. (:o)
very interesting Ellie. Thanks for providing all the details of your sleuthing.
I love those windows, and the way they are echoed in the door. Lovely photo.
Very interesting pic and info
Beautiful place and interresting comment ! Thank you for both !

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