E.J.Wilkins

19 Nov 2008 1,041 views
 
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photoblog image Autumn Fruits

Autumn Fruits


Hawthorn
Crataegus monogyna

This native tree is often used as a hedging plant because it has thick, short spines on the stems. It also looks beautiful in the spring when it's covered with flowers - "May Blossom". In the autumn the flowers have developed into these fruits which provide a valuable food resource for wildlife.

Packed full of folklore, the flowers are not meant to be brought into the house because they're swiftly followed by sickness and death - the scent was likened to The Plague, later identified as trimethylamine, which is a gas given off decaying tissue.

Young leaves can be eaten raw, often called "bread and cheese" - something I remember doing when I was little. The flowers can be made into drinks, the fruit into jam or syrups, rich in vitamin C.

The Glastonbury Thorn is a variety of Hawthorn, it flowers very early. Legend tells that it grew from Joseph of Arimathea's staff, which he pushed into the ground on the Wearyall Hill, near the Tor, while preaching there on Christmas Day. Apparently it still flowers on January 5th - the equivalent day since the calendar was changed in 1752. The original Glastonbury Thorn was chopped down by Puritans, luckily some cuttings were taken and plants grown elsewhere. There's one at Brickenden that flowers on cue each year.
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Autumn Fruits


Hawthorn
Crataegus monogyna

This native tree is often used as a hedging plant because it has thick, short spines on the stems. It also looks beautiful in the spring when it's covered with flowers - "May Blossom". In the autumn the flowers have developed into these fruits which provide a valuable food resource for wildlife.

Packed full of folklore, the flowers are not meant to be brought into the house because they're swiftly followed by sickness and death - the scent was likened to The Plague, later identified as trimethylamine, which is a gas given off decaying tissue.

Young leaves can be eaten raw, often called "bread and cheese" - something I remember doing when I was little. The flowers can be made into drinks, the fruit into jam or syrups, rich in vitamin C.

The Glastonbury Thorn is a variety of Hawthorn, it flowers very early. Legend tells that it grew from Joseph of Arimathea's staff, which he pushed into the ground on the Wearyall Hill, near the Tor, while preaching there on Christmas Day. Apparently it still flowers on January 5th - the equivalent day since the calendar was changed in 1752. The original Glastonbury Thorn was chopped down by Puritans, luckily some cuttings were taken and plants grown elsewhere. There's one at Brickenden that flowers on cue each year.
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comments (19)

They look delicious,Ellie!
Nicely done:p
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 19 Nov 2008, 00:19
Looks great sounds like a plant worth having in the garden.Like the red
Did you see my Hawthorn blog a few weeks ago Ellie?

http://tiff.shutterchance.com/photoblog/RURAL_REMEDIES_%28Number_one%29_/

We have both done the same thing but in different ways
EJWilkins: I wasn't here very often when you uploaded that picture, so hadn't seen it. You're right - similar theme isn't it smile
  • FLOOG
  • The library of my contented soul
  • 19 Nov 2008, 04:45
A scent likened to the plague.... there's a fine reason for appreciation then Ha ha smile

A fine photograph, beautiful vibrant colour and the delicate spiders web adding to the image.
  • Tracy
  • Staffs Moorlands UK
  • 19 Nov 2008, 07:38
We have lots of Hawthorn trees and hedges Ellie and the berries are in abundance.
Love your shot.
May blossom is pretty and the fruits look good and for the rest of the year we tend to ignore Hawthorntongue
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 19 Nov 2008, 08:29
Beautiful colours Ellie - love the detail of the little thread of spider's web.
Ingrid
This is a lovely picture, Ellie, very vibrant. And a lovely lot of information too.
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 19 Nov 2008, 09:09
What lovely red berries, nicely captured.
Good picture Elloe,lots of nice colour. Your narrative confirmed my activities when I was young and eat these berries and called them " bread and cheese".
are they eatible?
EJWilkins: Yes, they can be made into jam and jelly, used for wine making. The flowers can be used to make drinks and "infusions" too. The young leaves are also edible and can be used in salads.
I have a lot in the field between my house and the pond. The thorns are terrible if you happen to be unaware, as kids are. I have one that is absolutely hanging with fruit right now.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 19 Nov 2008, 13:48
Great colours in this image, Ellie.
Nice shot Ellie, they do tend to get overlooked.
Beautiful capture Ellie. Colours and lighting are superb!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 19 Nov 2008, 17:24
Oh those puritans again. I find this an interesting posting - I have only read about hawthorn before and from the books associate it with hedges. First time I see it, even if it is only a picture. So thanks.

Great picture as well.
Mmmm! Hermosos y brillantes frutos otoñales, Ellie!

Beautiful and shining autumnal fruits, Ellie!
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 19 Nov 2008, 22:10
And gives a nasty scatch when it cstches you! Lovely rich colours.
And nice continuation...keep go on smile

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aperture f/6.3
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 42.0mm
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