E.J.Wilkins

03 Dec 2008 747 views
 
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photoblog image Southampton Old Cemetery

Southampton Old Cemetery


Rhone and Wye Memorial

This memorial commemorates the loss of two sister ships of the Royal Mail Line on October 29th 1867. It was built by public subscription because so many of the men from these vessels came from Southampton.

This face shows the Wye demasted, the other side of the memorial shows the Rhone.

The loss of life during this hurricane is recorded as one of the - great UK marine disasters - on wikipedia - and - merchantnavyofficers - Royal Mail Steam Packet Company -

.....

On the 29th of October 1867 the Island of St Thomas was struck by a hurricane trapping sixty ships in the inner harbour, the following morning just two remained afloat. Royal Mail SPC lost the Rhone, Wye and Derwent, with the Conway being driven ashore. The Solent and Tyne weathered the storm as they were at the other anchorage but both were demasted. In all, over a thousand men perished.

The Masters of each ship did their utmost to ensure the safety of their vessels, passengers and crew but the storm was too fierce.

The Master of the Rhone (Robert F Wooley) tried to gain open sea whilst the eye of the hurricane passed, but he was swept overboard and the ship was blown back onto Black Rock Point / Salt Point, where she broke her back, the rush of cold water caused the engines to explode and she founded with a loss of all but 23 passengers and crew. Also on board were an unknown number of passengers taken from RMS Conway that had foundered losing all hands.

The Wye managed to leave St Thomas's harbour but struck Buck Island, two miles offshore.

News of the disaster was carried back to England on RMS Douro.

…..

The Rhone's Bell is in St George's Church on South Caicos, having apparently been recovered by Jeremiah D. Murphy who was a diver, employed by the Danish government to clear the harbour of debris following the hurricane. Read more – here -

The wreck of R.M.S. Rhone is now designated "R.M.S.Rhone National Marine Park", which means that nothing (neither artefacts nor wildlife specimens) may be removed from the site

The wreck was used for filming Peter Benchley's "The Deep".More information – here -


It looks as if I've got an html problem with this page, will contact admin and see if they can fix it
.

Southampton Old Cemetery


Rhone and Wye Memorial

This memorial commemorates the loss of two sister ships of the Royal Mail Line on October 29th 1867. It was built by public subscription because so many of the men from these vessels came from Southampton.

This face shows the Wye demasted, the other side of the memorial shows the Rhone.

The loss of life during this hurricane is recorded as one of the - great UK marine disasters - on wikipedia - and - merchantnavyofficers - Royal Mail Steam Packet Company -

.....

On the 29th of October 1867 the Island of St Thomas was struck by a hurricane trapping sixty ships in the inner harbour, the following morning just two remained afloat. Royal Mail SPC lost the Rhone, Wye and Derwent, with the Conway being driven ashore. The Solent and Tyne weathered the storm as they were at the other anchorage but both were demasted. In all, over a thousand men perished.

The Masters of each ship did their utmost to ensure the safety of their vessels, passengers and crew but the storm was too fierce.

The Master of the Rhone (Robert F Wooley) tried to gain open sea whilst the eye of the hurricane passed, but he was swept overboard and the ship was blown back onto Black Rock Point / Salt Point, where she broke her back, the rush of cold water caused the engines to explode and she founded with a loss of all but 23 passengers and crew. Also on board were an unknown number of passengers taken from RMS Conway that had foundered losing all hands.

The Wye managed to leave St Thomas's harbour but struck Buck Island, two miles offshore.

News of the disaster was carried back to England on RMS Douro.

…..

The Rhone's Bell is in St George's Church on South Caicos, having apparently been recovered by Jeremiah D. Murphy who was a diver, employed by the Danish government to clear the harbour of debris following the hurricane. Read more – here -

The wreck of R.M.S. Rhone is now designated "R.M.S.Rhone National Marine Park", which means that nothing (neither artefacts nor wildlife specimens) may be removed from the site

The wreck was used for filming Peter Benchley's "The Deep".More information – here -


It looks as if I've got an html problem with this page, will contact admin and see if they can fix it
.

comments (18)

This looks so early-Victorian Ellie!
EJWilkins: They did it so well, didn't they
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 3 Dec 2008, 05:05
Thanks for the history info.
EJWilkins: Glad you found it interesting
Very nice Ellie. It will be a long time before testing strength shows that this one will tumble.
Do they do these tests in your area? How can you test the likelihood of a headstone falling by giving it a kick from a jack-hammer? So many headstones in Kent have been removed after this test.
EJWilkins: They do those tests in some places, putting serious pressure on old stones that are sometimes damaged by the testing - self-proving don't you think? I can't comment on what I think about the procedure ... wink
I am not for cemetry photos
EJWilkins: No Chantal, some people aren't and I appreciate that. These are really "record" pictures more intended for information than anything else
  • Tracy
  • Staffs Moorlands England
  • 3 Dec 2008, 10:22
I see you blog is in varied colour again Ellie.smile
The info is great,but as you say somethings amiss.
Nice image.
EJWilkins: Urgh! It's ghastly isn't it, hopefully John or one of the others will fix it really soon.
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 3 Dec 2008, 11:48
Lovely image but they really seem to have mucked up the rest.
EJWilkins: The rest of the page will be fixed really soon, I'm sure wink
Fine shot Ellie. Thanks for the informative words.
EJWilkins: And thanks for your comment Richard
Great memorial Ellie, these places always seem to be overgrown to some extent these days though don't they.
EJWilkins: This cemetery is managed as a wildlife area, it's included with the adjoining Common for protection and so on. I've tried to explain why/how on Friday
This is a wonderful thing Ellie: and quite touching when you read the story
EJWilkins: Hmm, yes, too close to home sometimes when I read about maritime disasters.
That is a splendid memorial for the men mentioned in your blog. The Packet ships did have a lot of fatalities and this was evident at Mylor churchyard that I visited recently.

Being at sea in a hurricane must be indescribably frightening.
EJWilkins: Possibly more terrifying pre-steam, when there was only manpower and windpower to move a vessel from one place to another. The Rhone lost her anchor, which didn't help.

Seeing this memorial made me realise how so very important they are, especially for families who have no opportunity to say goodbye to their loved ones.
  • FLOOG
  • The valleys of a contented soul
  • 3 Dec 2008, 17:05
Extremely poignant. Beautifully made in the days when there was pride in workmanship and skills aplenty.

Very nicely observed, Ellie

The colours on your page are amazing smile
EJWilkins: Aha! The colours have now gone back to normal, although there's still a problem with tomorrow's page. Hopefully they'll be able to fix that too.

The memorial - it makes quite a statement really, about how things were done, how people were able to remember events and tragedies. The comparison with today isn't exactly comfortable.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Dec 2008, 19:54
Interesting memorial Ellie and as Chris says it does look very Victorian.
EJWilkins: It couldn't be from any other time could it?
Given how much I like cemeteries, I think I'll have a great time when I die smile smile
EJWilkins: I think so too smile
  • Alan
  • Southampton, on the sunny south coast of England
  • 3 Dec 2008, 21:44
The page is very colourful!

Interesting notes to accompany a fine image; pity about the sky, though - a few white fluffy clouds on a blue sky would be jolly good.
EJWilkins: The colours have, thank goodness, been fixed.

They sky? Yes, a bit of contrast would have been good, even a few clouds to relieve the flat grey - but you know what it's like here!
The old cemeteries always are an excellent source of photographic inspiration!
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 4 Dec 2008, 12:46
Love the selective colour on the next one. They really spent quite a bit on the dead in those days. No cheap burials.
Even during the death...
  • Tina
  • Canada
  • 21 Feb 2010, 02:52
Beautiful pics,, thank you. I am wondering if anyone knows of passenger/crew lists for the Rhone. John Bailey was a survivor and had a post card made with him on,, (Which I cannot find) but I would like to check the lists as a possible brother to John may have been on the Conway. This is a uncle to my husband, great great great. Any info appreicated. Thanks again

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