E.J.Wilkins

04 Dec 2008 816 views
 
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photoblog image Southampton Old Cemetery

Southampton Old Cemetery


Douro Memorial


*edit 4 Dec 2008
html problem / bright colours and inability to leave comments has been fixed


I mentioned Royal Mail Steam Packet Douro in my notes about the Rhone and Wye Memorial - here -. She is the vessel that carried the news of their loss back to England.

Sadly Douro was lost just a few years later, in a tragic accident.

Details are online elsewhere, but in brief, she was on her way from Rio de Janiero to Southampton, via Lisbon and was carrying a number of wealthy passengers, mail (for which Royal Mail Line had a contract) and a valuable cargo.

Having let 150 passengers off in Lisbon she was making very good time across the Bay of Biscay, at night, with deck lights still on. Navigation lights of an approaching vessel were recorded, it was assumed this vessel would pass astern, as normal, but it was not to be. At approximately 22:45 hrs the Yrurac Bat, a Spanish passenger liner out of Corunna, struck the Douro amidships.

There was some initial panic, as you would expect, women and children were put into lifeboats first. The crew went down with the ship, which sank within 30 minutes of the collision. Yrurac Bat also foundered.

The steamer, Hidalgo, was on hand to pick up survivors, but a total of 59 passengers and crew drowned.

.....

The wreck was discovered in 1995. It was emptied of all relics using a modified drilling rig to "scoop up the cargo" and any incidental artefacts, which were put up for sale.
.....

Various organisations and groups believe wrecks are a time capsule for archaeologists, that their contents should either be left where they are or, if artefacts are brought to the surface, they should be conserved and kept safe - either for research or put public display for the benefit of the wider population such as The Mary Rose in Portsmouth.

There has been significant international pressure to initiate a UNESCO Convention - here -  and - here - to protect wrecks that lie in international waters.

The concept doesn't appeal to wreck hunters who believe that the Titanic might not have been found had this been in place at the time. They also believe that if they put personal money towards searching for a wreck, which can take many years, there should be a profit if it is found, or at least full repayment of their expenses that can run into millions.

I can't say which point of view is right, although I have visited the Mary Rose in Portsmouth and know that it was the first time any modern person had seen many of the smaller items that were recovered - including the first ever Tudor arrows.

.....

My picture shows the front of the memorial, which is in Southampton because it was the vessel's home port, and also home to many of those who were lost.

TO THE MEMORY OF
CAPTAIN E. C. KEMP
THE OFFICERS, ENGINEERS & CREW
OF THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET
COMPANY'S SHIP "DOURO"
WHO PERISHED AT SEA
ON THE 1ST APRIL 1883
NOBLY SACRIFICING THEIR OWN LIVES
THAT OTHERS MIGHT BE SAVED

To the left of front:-
FOUNDERED
AFTER COLLISION

To the right of front:-
THIS MONUMENT
IS ERECTED
BY THEIR BROTHER OFFICERS
AND FRIENDS

To the rear, the names:-

E. C. KEMP             COMMANDER
A.H. TONGUE        CHIEF OFFICER           E. BURY           A.B.
F. LUCE                  3rd Do                             J.T. MILLER        F.M.
P.C. ATHERLEY    4th Do                             E. ADAMS            C.T.
H. WHITROW         PURSER                        S. THORNE         Do
W. YOUNG              CHIEF ENGR                C. SENIOR          SCULLION
R. CHILD                 2nd Do                           H.E. SYMONDS  CAPTn SERVt
J. MARSHALL         BOATSWAIN                  J. NUNES            STEWARD
.

Southampton Old Cemetery


Douro Memorial


*edit 4 Dec 2008
html problem / bright colours and inability to leave comments has been fixed


I mentioned Royal Mail Steam Packet Douro in my notes about the Rhone and Wye Memorial - here -. She is the vessel that carried the news of their loss back to England.

Sadly Douro was lost just a few years later, in a tragic accident.

Details are online elsewhere, but in brief, she was on her way from Rio de Janiero to Southampton, via Lisbon and was carrying a number of wealthy passengers, mail (for which Royal Mail Line had a contract) and a valuable cargo.

Having let 150 passengers off in Lisbon she was making very good time across the Bay of Biscay, at night, with deck lights still on. Navigation lights of an approaching vessel were recorded, it was assumed this vessel would pass astern, as normal, but it was not to be. At approximately 22:45 hrs the Yrurac Bat, a Spanish passenger liner out of Corunna, struck the Douro amidships.

There was some initial panic, as you would expect, women and children were put into lifeboats first. The crew went down with the ship, which sank within 30 minutes of the collision. Yrurac Bat also foundered.

The steamer, Hidalgo, was on hand to pick up survivors, but a total of 59 passengers and crew drowned.

.....

The wreck was discovered in 1995. It was emptied of all relics using a modified drilling rig to "scoop up the cargo" and any incidental artefacts, which were put up for sale.
.....

Various organisations and groups believe wrecks are a time capsule for archaeologists, that their contents should either be left where they are or, if artefacts are brought to the surface, they should be conserved and kept safe - either for research or put public display for the benefit of the wider population such as The Mary Rose in Portsmouth.

There has been significant international pressure to initiate a UNESCO Convention - here -  and - here - to protect wrecks that lie in international waters.

The concept doesn't appeal to wreck hunters who believe that the Titanic might not have been found had this been in place at the time. They also believe that if they put personal money towards searching for a wreck, which can take many years, there should be a profit if it is found, or at least full repayment of their expenses that can run into millions.

I can't say which point of view is right, although I have visited the Mary Rose in Portsmouth and know that it was the first time any modern person had seen many of the smaller items that were recovered - including the first ever Tudor arrows.

.....

My picture shows the front of the memorial, which is in Southampton because it was the vessel's home port, and also home to many of those who were lost.

TO THE MEMORY OF
CAPTAIN E. C. KEMP
THE OFFICERS, ENGINEERS & CREW
OF THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET
COMPANY'S SHIP "DOURO"
WHO PERISHED AT SEA
ON THE 1ST APRIL 1883
NOBLY SACRIFICING THEIR OWN LIVES
THAT OTHERS MIGHT BE SAVED

To the left of front:-
FOUNDERED
AFTER COLLISION

To the right of front:-
THIS MONUMENT
IS ERECTED
BY THEIR BROTHER OFFICERS
AND FRIENDS

To the rear, the names:-

E. C. KEMP             COMMANDER
A.H. TONGUE        CHIEF OFFICER           E. BURY           A.B.
F. LUCE                  3rd Do                             J.T. MILLER        F.M.
P.C. ATHERLEY    4th Do                             E. ADAMS            C.T.
H. WHITROW         PURSER                        S. THORNE         Do
W. YOUNG              CHIEF ENGR                C. SENIOR          SCULLION
R. CHILD                 2nd Do                           H.E. SYMONDS  CAPTn SERVt
J. MARSHALL         BOATSWAIN                  J. NUNES            STEWARD
.

comments (9)

  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 4 Dec 2008, 03:11
That's a lot of information, Ellie, about a tragic story. I have an ex-boss who now works for the company that owns the exclusive salvage rights to the Titanic. For those who have the interest, it really makes for quite an exhibition of the artifacts.
EJWilkins: I think the Titanic has been treated very carefully, and respectfully because it's a high profile wreck that still generates a lot of public interest. This one, well, there's information there but nobody really remembers it any more because it was one of many. Sad really
  • Frida
  • Sweden
  • 4 Dec 2008, 08:18
We had a tragic accident at sea in 1995 and there have been many discussions about how to protect the many people that lost their lives that night and the ship and the items buried with it.



MS Estonia
EJWilkins: Goodness, yes, I remember the Estonia tragedy, so many people lost so quickly, with emotions still very raw and recent for their families.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_Estonia
I like the processing, not the subject
EJWilkins: No, I know you don't like cemeteries Chantal, thanks though for taking the time to comment about the processing smile
Too many tragedies like this one happened Ellie!
Fine shot with the selective colouring.
EJWilkins: Fortunately less so these days, thanks to navigational aids and perhaps even better training. Let's hope it stays that way
  • Laurie
  • United States
  • 4 Dec 2008, 14:47
Interesting marker here. Very sad story attached to it.
EJWilkins: A terribly sad story isn't it
It is always a controversial issue where the interest of science or history or whatever involves places where people are buried. Can you justify disturbing the dead? I guess it depends on your beliefs in part, and how much the mortal remains matter.
EJWilkins: You've got it in one Bill - there's no way both sides will be happy as it stands and it almost risks underwater piracy of wrecks, after all who would be willing to invest millions and then give everything they find away? But then the archaeologists are right too - I've spent hours and hours looking at some of the tiny little things brought up with the Mary Rose, things we never even knew existed. Of course too there's the sanctity of a burial place, which is a comfort to both survivors and relatives of those lost. That, I think, fades with passing generations.
That is a very fine memorial to those who perished Ellie.
EJWilkins: It will have been a great comfort to the families of those who were lost, the men who went down with the ship did so voluntarily, knowing that others had been saved. Brave men.
Magnificent memorial Ellie, and great use of selective colouring.
EJWilkins: I thought the selective colouring was appropriate for this one, partly because it seemed to blend in with the surrounding trees and greenery rather too well.
It is a magnificent focus for the families of the men who gave their lives
This serie remembver me one I did about Lachaise' cemetery in Paris, I like very much !
EJWilkins: Thank you Zeb, cemeteries like this are wonderful places. I remember your series too. smile

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