E.J.Wilkins

06 Feb 2009 570 views
 
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photoblog image At the Allotment - January

At the Allotment - January


Weeding the beds

This is a more general view, giving an idea of what allotments look like. Each section is separated from its neighbour by a narrow grassed path.

There is no national standard size for an allotment, but they tend to be about 10 rods - which is about 302 square yards or approx 253 sq.m. (taken from - A brief history of Allotments in the UK - )

In the background you can see water butts and lidded compost bins.

The Parish Council owns the land and sets the rules. On this site there are 66 full plots, some of which are let as half plots. You can see the whole site from the air - here -

You might be able to tell that there were originally many more allotments, enclosed by the hedge you can see. The site was reduced in size when holding an allotment became unpopular.

At the moment there is quite a long waiting list, because people are trying to save money by growing their own. Of course, when you grow your own vegetables you know what's in them too - and they do taste much nicer.
.....

This series of pictures are from local Allotments, which is land owned by the council that can be rented for growing plants (fruit/vegetables/flowers) for personal use. The land is separated into measured strips, rather like the mediaeval field systems.

I do not have an allotment. I am grateful to the tenants who didn't mind me taking a few pictures.

Picture taken 16th January 2009
.....

The series can be seen by taking the last number from the url and hitting return.

For example -> http://ellie.shutterchance.com/photoblog/At_the_Allotment_-_January_/1/ is the first picture.

The whole series will be seen here -> http://ellie.shutterchance.com/photoblog/At_the_Allotment_-_January_/

*** Apologies to those of you who may have seen this picture in January, but I had put these pictures in what I thought was some sort of logical order and it got spoiled a bit by the downtime. So I'm re-running the last few, including the wheelbarrow which some of you have already commented on.

Please be patient, I'll get there in the end!***
.

At the Allotment - January


Weeding the beds

This is a more general view, giving an idea of what allotments look like. Each section is separated from its neighbour by a narrow grassed path.

There is no national standard size for an allotment, but they tend to be about 10 rods - which is about 302 square yards or approx 253 sq.m. (taken from - A brief history of Allotments in the UK - )

In the background you can see water butts and lidded compost bins.

The Parish Council owns the land and sets the rules. On this site there are 66 full plots, some of which are let as half plots. You can see the whole site from the air - here -

You might be able to tell that there were originally many more allotments, enclosed by the hedge you can see. The site was reduced in size when holding an allotment became unpopular.

At the moment there is quite a long waiting list, because people are trying to save money by growing their own. Of course, when you grow your own vegetables you know what's in them too - and they do taste much nicer.
.....

This series of pictures are from local Allotments, which is land owned by the council that can be rented for growing plants (fruit/vegetables/flowers) for personal use. The land is separated into measured strips, rather like the mediaeval field systems.

I do not have an allotment. I am grateful to the tenants who didn't mind me taking a few pictures.

Picture taken 16th January 2009
.....

The series can be seen by taking the last number from the url and hitting return.

For example -> http://ellie.shutterchance.com/photoblog/At_the_Allotment_-_January_/1/ is the first picture.

The whole series will be seen here -> http://ellie.shutterchance.com/photoblog/At_the_Allotment_-_January_/

*** Apologies to those of you who may have seen this picture in January, but I had put these pictures in what I thought was some sort of logical order and it got spoiled a bit by the downtime. So I'm re-running the last few, including the wheelbarrow which some of you have already commented on.

Please be patient, I'll get there in the end!***
.

comments (21)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 31 Jan 2009, 12:28
Looks like it could be a fun place to get ones hands dirty in the company of like-minded friends.
EJWilkins: There's usually a real "community" feeling with allotments, people see each other so often and help each other out too.
  • Aussie
  • Hot Hot Brisbane
  • 6 Feb 2009, 01:22
Wonder if they ever squabble over the use of insectacides etc. Lovely view.
EJWilkins: A lot of people who use allotments are near-organic, so I don't know
do you have one of these? I kind of wonder about how much money you save in gardening--by the time you pay for the seeds, and the fee.....?? I think it's probably more about people finding it relaxing to do this? I don't know.
EJWilkins: No Dawn, we don't have one. We're lucky enough to have a garden big enough to grow vegetables, although we don't grow many.

If you think about it, Time + seeds + gardening = exercise + fresh air + fresh produce, and you know what's in it too. A decent reward I think.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 6 Feb 2009, 03:51
Ellie I am enjoying this very good information
EJWilkins: I think I'm going to have to go back again later in the year and take some more pictures
I am full of admiration for this activity, Ellie.
EJWilkins: So am I Chad, the allotment plots are huge and take quite a bit of effort, but in return give enough fruit/veg to feed a family for a year.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 6 Feb 2009, 07:32
very informative, im not into gardening but can only respect those with green thumbs
EJWilkins: Practice, and getting tips from other gardeners probably helps a lot. Seeds don't mind if they land upside down, as long as the soil's right they'll do what they're programmed to do wink
Good photo Ellie. This allotment is a huge site, and obviously kept quite neat and tidy - the way they should be.

Sometimes they get very untidy and overgrown and look dreadful. We had one such close to where we used to live in UK, and it was a mess.
EJWilkins: The reason they reduced the size was because a lot weren't being let/rented, so were untidy, which made it harder for the allotment holders to keep their own plots weed free. I suppose it was easier/cheaper for some time to buy, but things are changing fast, as a lot of food is imported. Fresh stuff tastes nicer too smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 6 Feb 2009, 09:25
You managed a good composition here. The allotments are just what is required in the current economic climate.
EJWilkins: They are more and more essential, and the pity is that in London they closed allotments to build the wretched Olympics site.
Ellie....You have bought back many memories. Most folk had allotments during WW2..Our family had one in Sth Ruislip. I was only young and had to do the digging...which I think put me off of gardening for life...although my wife loves it. So thank you for sharing this..my wife thinks your great. Well done.
EJWilkins: Kind of your wife to say so, please say thank you.
When I look at these allotments I remember how hard my Dad worked to maintain our veg garden when I was little, it was hard work between shifts, but we ate well and relatively cheaply.
  • mikedi
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 Feb 2009, 10:08
Don't recognise the allotment - but nice shot with the twin exhaust barrow.
EJWilkins: They're in Pitmore Lane, Sway, just a little way back from the War Memorial wink
A very nice composition here Ellie. Well done!
EJWilkins: Thanks Richard
Lots of delightful info' here and a real bit of original photographic research breat Ellie.

It reminds me that whilst enjoying Higher Education back in the mid 60's a guy I shared a student house with was doing his dissertation on the history of allotments ... I remember reading a rough draft of it .. The development of them etc etc was fascinating.
richard

richard
EJWilkins: I don't know much about the history, but I have an instinct that they have to date back to enclosure and strip farming. Your friend's research must have made fascinating reading, he should re-publish it on the net.
We have community gardens here too but don't work on them in January. LOL
EJWilkins: There wouldn't be much work there over this last week either, because the weather has been so poor. The growing season here is quite long, because we aren't far from the coast, which helps quite a lot
Ellie, I`m sat here to-day thinking that I can`t imagine anything I would want to do less, than working on an allotment!

My judgement is being severely impaired by inches of freezing cold slush! Come the summer, though, I will be wishing I had one. lol! (:o)
EJWilkins: We had snow for about half a day, that was it. No, I can't imagine doing all the necessary to look after such a large area of vegetables/fruit either, but it's certainly worthwhile for those who do
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 6 Feb 2009, 13:25
Looking at your pic I remember the old saying: Every Englishman/woman is a gardener- by nature! An anglophil friend of mine possesses also a large garden (green, vegetables, fruits, flowers, shed) and sometimes I love to help there and afterwards a big gardenparty is going to start till midnight under the stars- following the old device: First hard work, then pure pleasure!
EJWilkins: I think you're right Philine and one of my Granddads was employed as a gardener, the other as a farm labourer - so it's 'in the blood'. Sadly not many people get the chance to even have a windowbox these days, because flats (apartments) are being built without even balconies.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 6 Feb 2009, 13:34
In our country it is an old natural life- tradition to have a garden, esp. in the big cities like Berlin, and to stay there during the summermonths - we say "Schrebergarten", nowadays in these times of fincial crunch and problems it has become proper again, also under young people, to work in the own garden and to eat the self- planted vegetables and fruits!
EJWilkins: Yes, growing your own fruit and vegetables is certainly healthier and much cheaper than buying them
I love this picture Ellie, apart from the compost bins this takes me back to when I used to go to his allotment with my Dad when I was a boy. Nice memory.
EJWilkins: There are memories that are huggable, aren't there. smile
  • _Monika_
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 Feb 2009, 21:23
Great series Ellie! I like the idea of working on allotment (my family always has grown its own fruit and veg) but never considered it an attractive place to take pictures. You have proved otherwise. Good job!
EJWilkins: There's such a lot to see, even when there isn't much growing. I must go back in a few weeks to see the changes.
I confess I don't even think about gardening until at least March! I'm not all that keen then!!
I have enjoyed this series Ellie
EJWilkins: We can't get onto our garden until about March because it's too wet, and then it seems to take off and we're fighting a losing battle until autumn.
Very interesting Ellie. Nice picture too.
EJWilkins: Thanks Albert
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 Feb 2009, 22:28
So this is gardening of a sort is it? Hmmmm.. not for me, though! My loss, I'm sure.
EJWilkins: Oh yes, and very dedicated people take these allotments too. Not for everybody, fortunately, otherwise the waiting list would be a few miles long!

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sensitivity ISO200
focal length 40.0mm
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