E.J.Wilkins

02 Apr 2009 740 views
 
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photoblog image Spring blooms

Spring blooms


Arum spp

This looks very much like our native Arum maculatum, the Cuckoo Pint, I've assumed it has to be the same species - although I've never seen a yellow one before. (I'll try to find out more if I have time)

It's a pity this has been caught by a late frost which has made part of the "flower" turn brown.

Picture taken at Exbury Gardens, 29th March 2009.

**midday 2nd April ** update
Many thanks to the Head Gardener at Exbury.

This is Lysichiton americanum, the American Skunk Cabbage (USA name = Western Skunk Cabbage).
It is a member of the Arum family - Araceae.
.....
The plant is considered an "invasive alien plant by EPPO and is included on the EPPO Action List" because in some parts of Europe it has caused local extinction of native species. The situation is being monitored.
More information - here -
.

Spring blooms


Arum spp

This looks very much like our native Arum maculatum, the Cuckoo Pint, I've assumed it has to be the same species - although I've never seen a yellow one before. (I'll try to find out more if I have time)

It's a pity this has been caught by a late frost which has made part of the "flower" turn brown.

Picture taken at Exbury Gardens, 29th March 2009.

**midday 2nd April ** update
Many thanks to the Head Gardener at Exbury.

This is Lysichiton americanum, the American Skunk Cabbage (USA name = Western Skunk Cabbage).
It is a member of the Arum family - Araceae.
.....
The plant is considered an "invasive alien plant by EPPO and is included on the EPPO Action List" because in some parts of Europe it has caused local extinction of native species. The situation is being monitored.
More information - here -
.

comments (19)

These are white where I come from. Cannot for the life of me think of the name.
Lovce the yellow!!
Cheers
Rob
EJWilkins: The Head Gardener from Exbury has provided the name. Apparently these can be quite smell plants!
  • Aussie
  • Australia
  • 2 Apr 2009, 03:42
Very unusual with the short stem. Beautiful colour against the brown leaves
EJWilkins: They're very unusual. I've now got the name - an "alien" species apparently
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 2 Apr 2009, 05:14
Wonderful flower,we do have 'family' of those in the Netherlands, never saw them in Yellow, wonderful picture.
EJWilkins: These ones come from USA. I have to thank Exbury's Head Gardener for the information smile
  • Chris
  • England
  • 2 Apr 2009, 06:26
Never seen one like this Ellie: although it's clearly related to our native 'Lords & Ladies.'
EJWilkins: It's an introduced species, Lysichiton americanum, same Arum family
A beautiful flowers, and the yellow is such a rich colour, as is the green. Makes a lovely contrast against the dead oak leaves.
EJWilkins: I think the bright yellow makes the old oak leaves look rather tired, which of course they are after lying around for several months.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 2 Apr 2009, 08:19
Lovely flowers but l have never seen there like, at least with that short stem
EJWilkins: I'd doubt if it will arrive in Australia, it's been listed as an alien species here in Europe now, because in some places it's swamped the local, native, ones.
It's Lysichiton americanum
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Apr 2009, 08:24
As usual. I'm amazed by your knowledge of the plants. This is a good esxample as it shows the various parts of the plant in different stages.
EJWilkins: I was almost there, it's an American plant introduction - thanks to Exbury's Head Gardener for giving me the information.
I'm sure there are loads of plants you automatically recognise without even realising it wink
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Apr 2009, 09:21
It does look like a giant version of the native species you see everywhere at this time of year. Maybe it's a mutation.
Ingrid
EJWilkins: Thanks the Exbury's Head Gardener I can give this a name, it's Lysichiton americanum - from USA
  • Philip
  • South Africa
  • 2 Apr 2009, 09:37
Stunning colours great contrast in colours well donesmile
EJWilkins: The bright yellow was absolutely stunning, more especially at this time of year when there's so little other colour from low growing plants
Great colour Ellie.
EJWilkins: It looked fabulous, the waxy yellow almost glowed
Great colours combination Ellie!
EJWilkins: They knew what they were doing when they planted it in that position. smile
Very nice plant Ellie, shame it is a bit of a pest to other species.
EJWilkins: A lot of imports have proved to be pest, squirrels are a fine example, as are those flatworms from New Zealand. It looks as if it's only been a problem in parts of Germany, the rest of the EU is keeping a watching brief on what it does.
Skunk cabbage suggests you wouldn't plant it near a window!
EJWilkins: I think you're probably right Bill, although I couldn't smell anything unpleasant when near this plant on Sunday. It may have been too cold.
More and more invasive species in every form are invading the world. Here in the aquaculture industry, it has become a disaster.
EJWilkins: One of the things some people forget is that native species have built up defences of some sort, when they're moved to another continent there are rarely any species that can attack them, so they thrive more than the local plants/animals.
Nature pushing through with Autumn leaves still there.Lovely yellows..shame about its history.
EJWilkins: It's only been a problem in parts of Germany, within the rest of the EU the authorities are keeping an eye on it. It certainly didn't look as if it was swarming over native plants at Exbury, was very well contained. smile
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Apr 2009, 19:13
Ooo Er these are exciting, a bit like red hot pokers but different. A cuckoo pint - now you are having me on ;o) Is that to do with it moving in where it doesn't belong?
EJWilkins: Specially for you Mike - I've looked to see if I can find the origin of the name Cuckoo Pint.

I thought the "Cuckoo" was because the plant appears about the same time as the Cuckoo, did see that the "Cuckoo" might relate to cuckold, but have managed to lose the link.

The "Pint" bit I had no idea, but apparently it's a bastardised/abbreviated version of the word Pintle or Pintel. Middle English for Penis.

This info is thanks to a few dictionaries and also online references to Richard Mabey's book "Flora Britannica"
http://www.boston.com/globe/search/stories/health/science_musings/020998.htm
http://www.sciencemusings.com/blog/2008/07/fox-gloves-and-cuckoo-pints.html
This chap has safely eaten the roots. Look at "Day 17"
http://www.wildmanwildfood.com/pages/day%201.html

Another common name for our native Arum was used by Chris - "Lords and Ladies". Maybe you can now guess why. wink
  • Frida
  • Sweden
  • 2 Apr 2009, 21:46
I can honestly say that I have never seen this kind of plant before smile
EJWilkins: I hadn't seen this one, but have seen the native species. They grow in damp soil and push up the flower heads some time around Easter most years. I'll try to find some to photograph for you smile
Splendid capture.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 3 Apr 2009, 02:55
"We come in peace"

Very pretty among the dead leaves, Ellie.

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