E.J.Wilkins

30 Sep 2009 532 views
 
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Cambridge


Gate of Honour

At Gonville and Caius College (pronounced "Keys"), half way along Senate House Pasage -here-

This was built in 1573 "... as part of a succession of gateways within the college to symbolise the intellectual passage of a student from ignorance to wisdom.

The first, the Gate of Humility, was originally entered from the street, and is now relocated in the Master's Garden. The second, the Gate of Virtue, can be seen between Gonville and Caius Courts. The final gate, the Gate of Honour, marks progress from the college to the Senate House and from thence into the outside world.

All three gates were designed by the master and co-founder of the college, the celebrated royal physician Dr Caius. (His original name was Keys, which he changed to the more scholarly and classical Caius!) He studied medicine in Padua in the 1560s and returned to England with Renaissance ideals and Italianate taste. The Gate of Honour is classical in detail, an unusual composition of an arched gateway surmounted by four columns and a pediment, topped by a stone hexagon carrying a sundial on each face."

Quoted from this site

Cambridge


Gate of Honour

At Gonville and Caius College (pronounced "Keys"), half way along Senate House Pasage -here-

This was built in 1573 "... as part of a succession of gateways within the college to symbolise the intellectual passage of a student from ignorance to wisdom.

The first, the Gate of Humility, was originally entered from the street, and is now relocated in the Master's Garden. The second, the Gate of Virtue, can be seen between Gonville and Caius Courts. The final gate, the Gate of Honour, marks progress from the college to the Senate House and from thence into the outside world.

All three gates were designed by the master and co-founder of the college, the celebrated royal physician Dr Caius. (His original name was Keys, which he changed to the more scholarly and classical Caius!) He studied medicine in Padua in the 1560s and returned to England with Renaissance ideals and Italianate taste. The Gate of Honour is classical in detail, an unusual composition of an arched gateway surmounted by four columns and a pediment, topped by a stone hexagon carrying a sundial on each face."

Quoted from this site

comments (13)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 30 Sep 2009, 00:28
A lovely story Ellie - but I've never seen such an eccentric piece of architecture before. Do you think it would help me if I changed my surname to Filpz?
EJWilkins: *chuckle* - I think you'd just confuse people Chris, stick with Phillips wink
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 30 Sep 2009, 01:21
A fabulous building, Ellie.
EJWilkins: It really is amazing, and quite bizarre too
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 30 Sep 2009, 02:38
Okay...I get the gates...but look at the SUNDIALS!
EJWilkins: Yes, they went all the way round - absolutely no excuse for not knowing the time! wink

I did think of you when I saw them
An odd looking structure Ellie. I hope he was a better physician than architect although in the 16th century I have my doubts tongue
EJWilkins: I think it's way OTT, but back then I suppose that style was popular - even though it didn't last long
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 30 Sep 2009, 07:54
l am with Ginnie l couldn't take my eyes off the sundials...fabulous
EJWilkins: Yes, I knew Ginnie would like them - they were all the way round the cupola.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 30 Sep 2009, 08:12
Yes, a really "eccentric" building built up in different architectural styles: a Palladian style palace- a Greek temple, a clock tower for Ginnie... wonderful!- and wonderful is your information about the "intellectual passage of a student from ignorance to wisdom" - yes, "humility" should be one behaviour of a student when beginning his studies -before any criticism...- first do listen to..- then do speak...!
I had thought that Sir Keys has changed his surname to the Latin Clusius (but there is still a famous botanicus Clusius)!
EJWilkins: Very eccentric, you're right.

I have no idea about the history of Dr Keys/Caius, never thought to look it up - so you could be right, maybe he changed his name more than once?
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 30 Sep 2009, 10:15
Great photo of this impressive,gate
EJWilkins: Truly impressive, and difficult to photograph because the walls to the left were high. It made the lower part of the picture very dark
Very interesting shot and narravtive Ellie, and of course the students bicycle leaning against the wall says this is Cambridge.
EJWilkins: Yes, it couldn't be anywhere else, could it?
Great capture of this unique structure Ellie!
EJWilkins: Unique is right smile
I guess most of these buildings could tell a story. Nicely presented Ellie.
EJWilkins: I think they could Ron, but I'd bet we wouldn't want to know some of the stories wink
nice one Ellie.
Tough skies, but got the exposure right... well done.. :L-)
Cheers
Rob
What a classic scene. So lovely and beautiful!
Oh this is simply glorious and ridiculous at the same time.

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