E.J.Wilkins

02 Oct 2009 567 views
 
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Cambridge


Corpus Christi Clock

This clock was erected in 2008, at the corner of the Corpus Christi Library in Cambridge, which is at the junction of Benet Street, King's Parade and Trumpington Street. - here -

You can see part of King's College reflected in the toughened window.
.....

It's an amazing thing to see. It's complicated, at first almost incomprehensible, fascinating too.

Perhaps it better to use somebody else's description and information. This is from Financial Express

The "Corpus clock" is the brainchild of inventor John Taylor, who used his own money to build it, in part to pay homage to the genius of John Harrison**, the Englishman who in 1725 invented the "grasshopper" escapement — a mechanical device that helps regulate a clock's movement.

Making a visual pun on the grasshopper image, Taylor has designed a fantasy version of a grasshopper at the top of the clock face, and uses this beast — with its long needle teeth and barbed tail — as an integral part of the clockworks.

Its jaws begin to open halfway through a minute, then snap shut at 59 seconds. The creature's eyes, usually a dull green, occasionally flash bright yellow. The oversize grasshopper is called a chronophage, or "time eater." "Time is gone, he's eaten it," Taylor said. "My object was simply to turn a clock inside out so that the grasshopper became a reality." At the unveiling, Hawking predicted the creature atop the clock would become "a much-loved, and possibly feared, addition to Cambridge's cityscape."

The chronophage stands atop the clock face, which is four feet (1.2 metres) in diameter. It displays time with light — a light races around the outer ring once every second, pausing briefly at the actual second. The next ring inside indicates the minute, and the inner ring shows the hour.

The lights are light-emitting diodes, or LEDS, which are constantly on. The apparent motion is regulated mechanically through slots in moving discs. Weirdly, the pendulum slows down or speeds up. Sometimes it stops, the chronophage shakes a foot, and the pendulum moves again. ... (read more here)
.....

This is a lot more information about the clock and the people involved in making it at  chronophage.co.uk
.....

N.B.
** John Harrison is the man who spent his life designing a chronograph specifically for use by seafarers which enabled them to work out their longitude. Read more about him here
.

Cambridge


Corpus Christi Clock

This clock was erected in 2008, at the corner of the Corpus Christi Library in Cambridge, which is at the junction of Benet Street, King's Parade and Trumpington Street. - here -

You can see part of King's College reflected in the toughened window.
.....

It's an amazing thing to see. It's complicated, at first almost incomprehensible, fascinating too.

Perhaps it better to use somebody else's description and information. This is from Financial Express

The "Corpus clock" is the brainchild of inventor John Taylor, who used his own money to build it, in part to pay homage to the genius of John Harrison**, the Englishman who in 1725 invented the "grasshopper" escapement — a mechanical device that helps regulate a clock's movement.

Making a visual pun on the grasshopper image, Taylor has designed a fantasy version of a grasshopper at the top of the clock face, and uses this beast — with its long needle teeth and barbed tail — as an integral part of the clockworks.

Its jaws begin to open halfway through a minute, then snap shut at 59 seconds. The creature's eyes, usually a dull green, occasionally flash bright yellow. The oversize grasshopper is called a chronophage, or "time eater." "Time is gone, he's eaten it," Taylor said. "My object was simply to turn a clock inside out so that the grasshopper became a reality." At the unveiling, Hawking predicted the creature atop the clock would become "a much-loved, and possibly feared, addition to Cambridge's cityscape."

The chronophage stands atop the clock face, which is four feet (1.2 metres) in diameter. It displays time with light — a light races around the outer ring once every second, pausing briefly at the actual second. The next ring inside indicates the minute, and the inner ring shows the hour.

The lights are light-emitting diodes, or LEDS, which are constantly on. The apparent motion is regulated mechanically through slots in moving discs. Weirdly, the pendulum slows down or speeds up. Sometimes it stops, the chronophage shakes a foot, and the pendulum moves again. ... (read more here)
.....

This is a lot more information about the clock and the people involved in making it at  chronophage.co.uk
.....

N.B.
** John Harrison is the man who spent his life designing a chronograph specifically for use by seafarers which enabled them to work out their longitude. Read more about him here
.

comments (14)

  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 2 Oct 2009, 01:53
What a fascinating read, Ellie. I can imagine it's a delight to behold.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 2 Oct 2009, 06:15
That's my kind of grasshopper...sort of mini battle dragon.

Very interesting post, Ellie.
Great clock and lots of very interesting stuff to go with it Ellie
  • Chris
  • England
  • 2 Oct 2009, 08:08
I've heard aboutthis Ellie but never seen it - a fascinating thing!
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 2 Oct 2009, 10:00
Good info,great looking clock,well captured
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 2 Oct 2009, 10:11
To complicated for me Ellie, but the image and reflection are great
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Oct 2009, 10:54
I'm glad you said it was a clock as otherwise I wouldn't have had a clue! An amazing creation.
Ingrid
Quite an amazing capture with these reflections Ellie!
  • Mary MacADNski
  • Beautiful Prince Edward Island, Canada
  • 2 Oct 2009, 12:05
Fascinating! I will send an e-card to my son who has a thing for watches and clocks.
  • Conrad
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Oct 2009, 14:46
god colours and reflection
  • Frida
  • Sweden
  • 2 Oct 2009, 16:45
Avery beautiful clock and a fascinating story.
This is new to me as well..An interesting history Ellie. A fine image.
An amazing timepiece and the reflection places the clock in its surroundings quite nicely Ellie.
This is a fascinating clock for sure and the reflection just adds so much attention and detail into the shot. Great job!

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camera E-400
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/1250s
aperture f/4.5
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 14.0mm
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