E.J.Wilkins

09 Oct 2009 1,330 views
 
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York


York Minster - Five Sisters Window


My notes are taken from - this pdf - which contains a lot more information than I've quoted :-

... The north wall of the North Transept is filled with the imposing mixture of stone and glass that forms the Five Sisters Window.

It is the oldest complete window in York Minster and dates from around the year 1260.

In comparison to other windows in the building the Five Sister can appear quite dark and confusing. This is, in part, due to the excessive amount of repair leads which confuse the image, and the protective outer glazing that cuts down the amount of light entering the building from the north.


The Five Sisters is made of "grisaille" glass fashionable in the thirteenth century England.

Grisaille or Cistercian glass was typically formed by painting complex foliage patterns on pieces of white or silvery grey glass. The pieces were then formed into strong geometric patterns with the skilful use of
the lead cames that hold the pieces together, the lead being as integral a part of the design as the glass.

Each of the magnificent lancets stands 16.3m tall and is 1.55m wide. In total the window contains over 100,000 individual pieces of glass. ...


For those who don't do metric, each of the lancets is 50 ft high and 5 feet across.

It wasn't easy to take a picture without including people, to edit it so some detail could be seen (portrait images don't display well) I've ended up chopping off the feet of the individuals in the foreground, but I still think it gives a good idea of the sheer scale of this massive window and also a tiny part of the intricate ceiling.

**edit**
evening 9th October
Realise there's an upload issue here, with a white section to the right edge of the picture, making it appear that it's been rotated.
Haven't a clue how it got there.
.

York


York Minster - Five Sisters Window


My notes are taken from - this pdf - which contains a lot more information than I've quoted :-

... The north wall of the North Transept is filled with the imposing mixture of stone and glass that forms the Five Sisters Window.

It is the oldest complete window in York Minster and dates from around the year 1260.

In comparison to other windows in the building the Five Sister can appear quite dark and confusing. This is, in part, due to the excessive amount of repair leads which confuse the image, and the protective outer glazing that cuts down the amount of light entering the building from the north.


The Five Sisters is made of "grisaille" glass fashionable in the thirteenth century England.

Grisaille or Cistercian glass was typically formed by painting complex foliage patterns on pieces of white or silvery grey glass. The pieces were then formed into strong geometric patterns with the skilful use of
the lead cames that hold the pieces together, the lead being as integral a part of the design as the glass.

Each of the magnificent lancets stands 16.3m tall and is 1.55m wide. In total the window contains over 100,000 individual pieces of glass. ...


For those who don't do metric, each of the lancets is 50 ft high and 5 feet across.

It wasn't easy to take a picture without including people, to edit it so some detail could be seen (portrait images don't display well) I've ended up chopping off the feet of the individuals in the foreground, but I still think it gives a good idea of the sheer scale of this massive window and also a tiny part of the intricate ceiling.

**edit**
evening 9th October
Realise there's an upload issue here, with a white section to the right edge of the picture, making it appear that it's been rotated.
Haven't a clue how it got there.
.

comments (14)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 9 Oct 2009, 02:07
This has a grand scale Ellie
EJWilkins: Very grand Chris, very grand
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 9 Oct 2009, 06:07
Impressive in every sense, Ellie.
EJWilkins: Yes, I think deliberately so
  • graham pickett
  • SOUTHSEA ENGLAND
  • 9 Oct 2009, 08:15
Wow! beautiful sense of the sheer size,scale and the way you have used the light is delightful.What lens did you use Ellie?
EJWilkins: Hi Graham, nice to "see" you again. I heard you were planning to get a camera. What did you choose?
The lens for this was the Zuiko 14-42mm, on of Olympus's "kit" lenses.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 9 Oct 2009, 08:49
Its huge Ellie and very well presented
EJWilkins: Err, yes, huge is probably the best word to use.
Quite impressive Ellie.
Perfect symmetry here!
EJWilkins: They knew what they were doing, didn't they
What a massive window Ellie, the people give it a great sense of scale.
EJWilkins: It dwarfs people, which is why, although I'd have preferred the pictures people free, they're essential to show how huge it is
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 9 Oct 2009, 12:18
It is enormous,great detail
EJWilkins: Yep, you're right, it is enormous
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 9 Oct 2009, 12:21
You captured very well the space feeling- how little are we human beans! It is okay to 'chop off the feet" of the visitors- the "five sisters" are the main persons, it is impossible to get a closer look at the floral ornaments of the windows and their magic colours and lighting.
EJWilkins: The people are almost insignificant, they're transitional, the church isn't - maybe that's how it's been able to grow over the centuries
The people really show the immense size of this place very well. Can you iamgine them building something like this now?
EJWilkins: I seem to recall that there are some new religious buildings capable of holding 5k people, and they aren't Christian.
What a window, there must be hours of work put into it. Nice shot.
EJWilkins: I think it was years of work Linda smile
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 9 Oct 2009, 14:24
I have 3 sisters, Ellie and 4 brothers. I can just imagine a depiction of THAT! This is a lovely wide-angle view.
EJWilkins: It wasn't easy to take this, partly because of the people, partly because of the scale.
Couldn't imagine taking a successful group image of more than a couple of people, ever!
The people add to the scale of it Ellie..Nice one.
EJWilkins: Very little things, people - at least that's the way it looks
Well done Ellie, very well done. You've done a great job on a difficult subject.
EJWilkins: Quite difficult because it's so huge, I'm sure others would have done better
Another time, it's a great shot, Ellie !!! Good job !
EJWilkins: Yes, this wouldn't be built these days, for one reason or another. Sad really

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camera E-400
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/10s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity ISO400
focal length 14.0mm
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