E.J.Wilkins

15 Sep 2010 398 views
 
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photoblog image Mérida, Spain

Mérida, Spain

National Museum of Roman Art

This is, according to somebody who studies the Classical World, a very important sculpture. Rather than try to explain why, it's probably best to use the words taken from the Museum's own site :-

 

This portrait of Augustus with a veil, which marks his status of Chief Pontiff, constitutes one of the museum’s most treasured pieces and one of the most beautiful Roman portraits in the Iberian Peninsula.

 

It is made of Carrara marble and follows the model known as “ Augustus of Via Labicana”, today in the National Museum of Termas in Rome.

 

Pity the picture isn't sharper, but never mind.

 

If you'd like to know more about this amazing Museum and some of its' priceless and awe-inspiring exhibits please take a look the text accompanying other pictures I've uploaded, they can be found - here -

 

If you'd like to know more about this amazing Museum and some of its' priceless and awe-inspiring exhibits please take a look the text accompanying other pictures I've uploaded, they can be found - here -.

.

Mérida, Spain

National Museum of Roman Art

This is, according to somebody who studies the Classical World, a very important sculpture. Rather than try to explain why, it's probably best to use the words taken from the Museum's own site :-

 

This portrait of Augustus with a veil, which marks his status of Chief Pontiff, constitutes one of the museum’s most treasured pieces and one of the most beautiful Roman portraits in the Iberian Peninsula.

 

It is made of Carrara marble and follows the model known as “ Augustus of Via Labicana”, today in the National Museum of Termas in Rome.

 

Pity the picture isn't sharper, but never mind.

 

If you'd like to know more about this amazing Museum and some of its' priceless and awe-inspiring exhibits please take a look the text accompanying other pictures I've uploaded, they can be found - here -

 

If you'd like to know more about this amazing Museum and some of its' priceless and awe-inspiring exhibits please take a look the text accompanying other pictures I've uploaded, they can be found - here -.

.

comments (19)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 15 Sep 2010, 00:47
Sharp enough to show the beauty of the work, Eeejay.
EJWilkins: Thanks, and I notice you noticed the name change too. Now all I've got to do is get people to try to forget the "Ellie" and maybe get used to using the name my family use ... that'll come later. wink
For a moment I thought it was the Statue of Alexander. Beautiful!Love the bricks in the background.Also like the composition.
EJWilkins: The way this looks against the background indicates how well the architect understood his 'brief', I think it looks good too.
If this sculpture is any indication of the calibre of Roman art to be found at this museum, Ellie, it should be a place not to miss if I ever have the opportunity to visit Merida. Very nicely presented here, too.
EJWilkins: It is a fair indication Beverly ... but Merida has other surprises too. The town is home to 29 Roman sites that are listed by UNESCO as World Heritage sites. We didn't managed to see them all.
What a beautiful sculpture, Ellie. I can see why it is such a treasure. Love the image, too. (:o)
EJWilkins: To be honest I didn't fully understand the significance until I looked it up online.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 15 Sep 2010, 06:00
This is a fabulous statue, wonderful artwork, love the background.
EJWilkins: It's so 'real' isn't it, and the background indicates the skill of the architect
the brickpatterns works wonders
EJWilkins: It does, and doesn't detract from the sculpture either
The bricks provide a striking contrast.
EJWilkins: They do don't they.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 15 Sep 2010, 07:47
This is all very imprerssive Ellie: just think how old this artifact is!
EJWilkins: I know, it's a bit mind-boggling really.
Just imagine in as it would have been, with a complete nose and painted to resemble the original eye colours, etc. It would have been quite a stunner!
EJWilkins: I wondered if it was ever meant to be part of a full statue, but perhaps not. It would have been amazing 'painted up' - I hadn't imagined they did that.
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 15 Sep 2010, 08:56
Looks like he's fallen flat on his face at some time. The background sets off the image.
EJWilkins: I think, although I'm not sure, that the nose damage may have been as a result of a later invasion when artefacts were despoiled ... but I'm not sure.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 15 Sep 2010, 09:18
I'm not sure I've ever seen one of these with a veil, Ellie. Your composition is fabulous and totally sharp enough!
EJWilkins: No, I haven't, and I didn't really understand the significance when we were there. And also there was just so much to take in, all of it wonderful.
  • vintage
  • Brisbane Australia
  • 15 Sep 2010, 11:00
Fab photo
EJWilkins: Thanks
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 15 Sep 2010, 11:08
Yes, it is a very famous statue depicted in some schoolbooks: Augustus Octavianus, the veil shows that he is making a sacrifice. A fine picture and I may feel the smoothness of the cold Carrara marble! (Sorry, Chad looks a bit like him, isn't it)
EJWilkins: I had absolutely no idea it was so important Philine.

You're right, Chad must be a descendent!
Very well preserved statue Ellie, shame about the damaged nose.
EJWilkins: It is a pity about the nose, but at least the rest of it survived intact for us to see
The brick wall is razorsharp Ellie wink I like the photo a lot, it is a beautiful statue and I had no idea of the status of the veil. So thanks for the lesson

In the netherlands, there is a saying: Wie zijn neus schendt, schendt zijn aangezicht" which means as much as "He who talks with no honour of his relatives, dishonours himself'
EJWilkins: Yes, it was badly focused, I was taking 'holiday snaps' so I could take my time to see things later. Unfortunately this is the only picture that was a 'fail'.

Not sure of the significance of the saying, but it is true.
The bricks really makes the head stand out, nicely composed too smile
EJWilkins: The architect did his job well, which is probably why he's won prizes
Pity we missed Merida. I like the contrast between the subject and background.
EJWilkins: I think a lot of people do miss it Graeme, we were told about it by work colleagues who know the area. There were a lot of tourists, but most were Spanish or Portuguese. It's only about 3 hours drive from Lisbon.
It is a beautiful sculpture, probably the most important of this beautiful museum (and it seems to me).
I hope you enjoy. your visit. Did you have the opportunity to enjoy a classic play live?
EJWilkins: We thoroughly enjoyed our visit, but the two days we had booked for our stay (in Puebla de la Calzada) was not long enough to see everything properly.

Sadly we were unable to see a Classical Play live at the theatre, it would have been a wonderful experience.

I hope, one day, we will be able to return.
beutifull image, only a coment, i wish a little more space above
EJWilkins: Yes, now you mention it you are absolutely right. I should have cropped more from the lower part of the picture and less from the top. A careless mistake on my part. Thank you for pointing it out. smile

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