E.J.Wilkins

20 Sep 2010 395 views
 
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photoblog image Mérida, Spain

Mérida, Spain

National Museum of Roman Art

Missorium of Theodosius I

 

I can't imagine hitting something like this with a plough, and then trying to find scraps of silver in the soil.

 

First thoughts on seeing this could be that it's a bit unusual to have cherubs on a Roman piece, but Theodosius was a Christian and is acklnowledged as a Saint by the Greek Orthodox Church.

 

He was born in Cacua, Spain, on 11th January 397 A.D. and was baptised by Acholius of Thessalonica during the autumn of 380 A.D. 

 

He was Emperor from 379 to 395 A.D. There is a detailed life history and career - here -

 

 If you'd like to know more about this amazing Museum and some of its' priceless and awe-inspiring exhibits

please take a look the text accompanying other pictures I've uploaded.

They can be found - here -.

.

Mérida, Spain

National Museum of Roman Art

Missorium of Theodosius I

 

I can't imagine hitting something like this with a plough, and then trying to find scraps of silver in the soil.

 

First thoughts on seeing this could be that it's a bit unusual to have cherubs on a Roman piece, but Theodosius was a Christian and is acklnowledged as a Saint by the Greek Orthodox Church.

 

He was born in Cacua, Spain, on 11th January 397 A.D. and was baptised by Acholius of Thessalonica during the autumn of 380 A.D. 

 

He was Emperor from 379 to 395 A.D. There is a detailed life history and career - here -

 

 If you'd like to know more about this amazing Museum and some of its' priceless and awe-inspiring exhibits

please take a look the text accompanying other pictures I've uploaded.

They can be found - here -.

.

comments (18)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 20 Sep 2010, 06:11
Wow what a find
EJWilkins: I know!
great composition like this
EJWilkins: Thanks
  • Chris
  • England
  • 20 Sep 2010, 07:27
I wonder how long this lovely thing was in the ground Ellie - and how it got there in the first place?
EJWilkins: The Romans left but presumably some stayed - same as in Britain. Then there was a time of 'nothing', no invasions and then the Moors came. Possibly it was buried for safe keeping, but the owner failed to return. The dry soil possibly kept it relatively free of corrosion - I'd thought silver was too volatile(?) to last long in the ground.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 20 Sep 2010, 07:40
The things we can learn from history, Ellie! Beautifully presented.
EJWilkins: There's so much we'll never know it all, but it's so good to find, and learn, new things from the past.
What a wonderful find Ellie, I like this very much.
EJWilkins: I do too smile
What an amazing find Ellie. Very nicely captured!
EJWilkins: Astonishing thing to find, isn't it
Interesting artifact and an excellent presentation Ellie.
EJWilkins: Thanks. I've learned to take pictures of information - it's so easy to think I'll remember all the details of every picture I take, but I never do!
  • Tracy
  • UK
  • 20 Sep 2010, 13:05
What a delightful find that would have been Ellie. Love the crispness of your shot and info
EJWilkins: Thanks, it did have a tweak or two in Gimp, to get rid of a stray light and some awkward reflections.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 20 Sep 2010, 14:09
A work of great beauty, no less so for the damage it has sustained, Ellie.
EJWilkins: It is beautiful, isn't it
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 20 Sep 2010, 16:00
For a Christian, he seems to have done strange things - like the requirement that he should be worshiped and having the Mother Earth goddess on his plate. So to see, he had a lot on his plate.
EJWilkins: Ah, the earth stuff shows how bountiful he was, and how lucky people were to have him as their Emperor. Maybe he did, indeed, have a lot on his plate - we don't know how wide he really was!
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 20 Sep 2010, 17:49
It is amazing how very well the people were able to 'work' silver in those early years, a wonderful piece of art it is.
EJWilkins: I suppose the thing is Astrid, that history is written by people who are alive about people who are dead. We know the Romans were, in general, very clever and some of them had a lot of good ideas. So did the Greeks. But, those who came after perhaps want to prove their superiority, so decry their skills and abilities. It's only when you're confronted with stuff like this that it's possible, and reasonable, to question (and challenge) what's written in the history books.
The old emperor looks a bit gormless. What a find though!
EJWilkins: He does, sort of, almost coy.
i have heard of inflation buts thats ridiculous, wow what a size good photo Ellie
EJWilkins: It'd be difficult to carry a coin this size, the thing is about two feet across!
Lovely capture, Ellie. Nice crisp detail, and excellent information as ever. Imagine finding this! wow! (:o)
EJWilkins: I'd be delighted to find a common Roman coin or a scrap of pottery, I can't imagine every finding anything as amazing as this.
  • Scotia
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 Sep 2010, 23:00
Amazing place I am enjoying your series very much smile
EJWilkins: I wish I'd taken more, better, pictures. It was such a rush to see everything in the museum. But, there's the other sites in the town too - I hope you enjoy those as much.
It's a lovely piece to find under your plough! Must be worth a mint!
EJWilkins: You could probably start a mint with this much silver!
  • Aussie
  • Australia
  • 21 Sep 2010, 11:16
Can you imagine finding this, gorgeous capture.
EJWilkins: I try to imagine, but to be honest I can't even imagine how I'd feel if I found a very common and almost worthless Roman coin.
good piece of past!

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