E.J.Wilkins

21 Sep 2010 518 views
 
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photoblog image Mérida, Spain

Mérida, Spain

National Museum of Roman Art

It seems such a pity that there are only broken pieces of this sculpture group left, because the work is astonishingly intricate. For example the detail of the plaited tassels (presumably to stop the fabric fraying) on the lower edge of Aeneas's tunic - yes, I did photograph them, but had to decide what to and what not to upload.

 

When you think that this was carved 2,000 years ago, was left behind when the Romans moved away and also somehow survived several hundred years of Moorish rule, I think we're lucky to be able to see this much.

 

There are many, more modern, representations of this group fleeing Troy (as recounted in Virgil's Aeneid) but the most similar contemporary image I've been able to find is this copy of a wall painting from the Via d'Abbondanza in Pompeii (first century AD). The original painting is in EUR (Rome), Museum of Roman Civilization.

 

Picture from vroma.org Credit - Barbara McManus, 2003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 If you'd like to know more about either the Spanish National Museum of Roman Art (and some of its' priceless and awe-inspiring exhibits) or the "Archaeological Ensemble of Mérida", please take a look my other pictures and their accompanying text.

They can be found - here -.

.

Mérida, Spain

National Museum of Roman Art

It seems such a pity that there are only broken pieces of this sculpture group left, because the work is astonishingly intricate. For example the detail of the plaited tassels (presumably to stop the fabric fraying) on the lower edge of Aeneas's tunic - yes, I did photograph them, but had to decide what to and what not to upload.

 

When you think that this was carved 2,000 years ago, was left behind when the Romans moved away and also somehow survived several hundred years of Moorish rule, I think we're lucky to be able to see this much.

 

There are many, more modern, representations of this group fleeing Troy (as recounted in Virgil's Aeneid) but the most similar contemporary image I've been able to find is this copy of a wall painting from the Via d'Abbondanza in Pompeii (first century AD). The original painting is in EUR (Rome), Museum of Roman Civilization.

 

Picture from vroma.org Credit - Barbara McManus, 2003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 If you'd like to know more about either the Spanish National Museum of Roman Art (and some of its' priceless and awe-inspiring exhibits) or the "Archaeological Ensemble of Mérida", please take a look my other pictures and their accompanying text.

They can be found - here -.

.

comments (18)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 21 Sep 2010, 00:49
It looks wonderful.
EJWilkins: It is, the small pictures don't really do it justice.
  • Peter
  • Canada
  • 21 Sep 2010, 03:40
Fabulous presentation Ellie and i agree with you about the detailed workmanship to sculpture.....it's simply unbelievable....petersmile
EJWilkins: I could have spent a week sharing pictures of just these three items, because they were so carefully carved and also so well preserved, even though they're really only fragments of the whole thing. I could have looked at it for ages.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 21 Sep 2010, 08:54
The quality of sculpting, especially on the left hand figure is very impressive Ellie
EJWilkins: The figure of Ascanius really does show movement and, somehow, a sense of urgency. Aeneas's kilt though is so intricately carved as to be mindblowing, you'd think it had been sewn rather than made out of rock. These little pictures aren't really good enough to show the detail, but they do give an idea of how amazingly good it is. And to think we don't know who carved them!

Such a skill - and look at the carp we're told is 'good art' these days!
Very impressive. They make some of today's "craftsmen" look like beginners.
EJWilkins: Exactly! But there are equally good craftsmen, and women, these days who work on cathedrals. Their work might be anonymous, but is likely to stand the test of time.
Superb sculptures Ellie!
Very nicely presented.
EJWilkins: Yes, they are superb
I am really enjoying this series. I can`t believe how the carving has remained so crisp. Even in this fragmented form, it is just breathtaking. (:o)
EJWilkins: We had so little time and so much to see that I turned into a happy snapper, with the predictable (and disappointing) outcome. I'm glad that these were at least sharp because the work is so astonishingly good.
They try to tell us that people were unskilled, but they weren't were they.
Apart from being a very good collage Ellie it has so much information included in it.
EJWilkins: As I'm sure you can imagine Brian I could have made a whole week's worth of pictures out of just this group of artefacts, but it'd have been too 'slow' really. I know the detail is lost in the little pictures, but I'm pleased to know you think the collage works and does what I intended. Let's hope that one day you can get to Merida to see this for yourself.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 21 Sep 2010, 13:21
Such wonderful craft
EJWilkins: I know, and two thousand years told too!
Wonderful detail Ellie.
EJWilkins: I think this has been added to your 'must see' list of places. smile
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 Sep 2010, 17:40
Good photos and very informative. My favourite period in history.
EJWilkins: Some historians do the Romans a huge disservice, I think much more effort should be put into acknowledging their artistic legacy.
Wonderful quality. If only it were complete!
EJWilkins: If only! Those were my words when I saw these. Such a pity, but also such a blessing that so much was preserved undamaged.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 21 Sep 2010, 19:49
I very appreciate your presentation (introduced by concise information):grandious sculptures indeed, and we can feel your enthousiasm to observe and to take them en detail!
EJWilkins: Thank you Philine, I appreciate that comment. It took a while to get this 'right' ... because the pieces were so amazing they deserved a bit of effort.
Wow!!! Magnificent drape!!... A+ VAL smile
EJWilkins: Thank you smile
Best of the series so far Ellie.Nicely presented and informative as always.
EJWilkins: Glad you think so, because tomorrow we move outside to have a look at some of the other places in Merida.
  • Scotia
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 Sep 2010, 21:48
2,000 years simply amazing Ellie
EJWilkins: I know! Mindblowing isn't it!
As you say, such a pity, EJ
EJWilkins: Such a pity, but then without these we wouldn't have known what we are missing would we?
  • Alan
  • Somewhere in Montana
  • 22 Sep 2010, 00:01
It's very cultural; wasted on me, I'm afraid but it does make a good photo. As you say, the level of detail is amazing.

Is the Museum OK with people taking photos? You can't do it inside NT places.
EJWilkins: Yes, they were absolutely fine with photography - but no flash.

If you were to visit this place Alan, you'd be drawn in by what you see, it would be impossible not to be awed.
absoloutely amazing sculptures, well shot
EJWilkins: They are absolutely amazing, it was a treat to see them

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