E.J.Wilkins

27 Sep 2010 508 views
 
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photoblog image Mérida, Spain

Mérida, Spain

"Temple of Diana"/Municipal Forum.

This is known locally as the Temple of Diana although the dedication has been ruled out by researchers.

 

Information boards at the site explain that the 'temple' was built during the time of Augustus Caesar, 1st century A.D.. It was part of the municipal forum, re-creating the forum of Augustus in Rome, and was used for the 'imperial cult', not Diana.

 

Built of granite, the structure was originally 40 metres long, had 6 columns at the front and 11 columns at the sides.

 

It was abandoned in 5th century and later put to public use by both the Visigoths and the Moors. Towards the end of the 15th Century "los Señores de los Corbos" built a property known as "Casa de los Milagros" - the 'House of Miracles' - which enclosed/incorporated part of the 'temple', with the columns at the front forming a portico/entrance.

 

The site was privately owned until 1972, when it passed into the hands of the state. Since then it's been the subject of various excavations and renovations. Work continues to maintain and protect the monument and its' environment.

.

Mérida, Spain

"Temple of Diana"/Municipal Forum.

This is known locally as the Temple of Diana although the dedication has been ruled out by researchers.

 

Information boards at the site explain that the 'temple' was built during the time of Augustus Caesar, 1st century A.D.. It was part of the municipal forum, re-creating the forum of Augustus in Rome, and was used for the 'imperial cult', not Diana.

 

Built of granite, the structure was originally 40 metres long, had 6 columns at the front and 11 columns at the sides.

 

It was abandoned in 5th century and later put to public use by both the Visigoths and the Moors. Towards the end of the 15th Century "los Señores de los Corbos" built a property known as "Casa de los Milagros" - the 'House of Miracles' - which enclosed/incorporated part of the 'temple', with the columns at the front forming a portico/entrance.

 

The site was privately owned until 1972, when it passed into the hands of the state. Since then it's been the subject of various excavations and renovations. Work continues to maintain and protect the monument and its' environment.

.

comments (17)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 27 Sep 2010, 02:13
Impressive set of columns, Ellie.
EJWilkins: It is, isn't it.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 27 Sep 2010, 07:10
Well it's nice to see someone is conserving it Ellie
EJWilkins: Better late than never isn't it. I'm not quite sure what might have happened if this had stayed in private ownership - if it had been possible.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 27 Sep 2010, 07:50
I really like your POV on this architectural gem, Ellie. Aren't we glad such places are maintained and protected! They sure tell us of another day, another time.
EJWilkins: I thought you might like the crane Ginnie. I was a bit irritated when it swung into the scene, and was tempted to edit it out, but realised it offered something more than the 'usual' and offered a bit of an insight into what Spain is trying to do with the site.
  • Tracy
  • UK
  • 27 Sep 2010, 08:44
It amazes me how these structures always look so elegant.
EJWilkins: They do, it looks as if the Romans learned a thing or two from the Greeks.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 27 Sep 2010, 09:33
It must be quite interesting to have a structure like this as private property - although I wouldn't know exactly what to do with it smile
EJWilkins: I think it would be a terrifying responsibility, with so many rules and regulations saying what you could or couldn't do.
The Greeks would be mouth hit if they could see how 'their' style has spread around the world.
EJWilkins: They most certainly would.
Lovely structure!!
EJWilkins: It is indeed.
How good that this is being looked after properly, it is a fine building.
EJWilkins: It is, but I wouldn't mind betting the mediaeval house is quite interesting too.
A beautiful and very nicely preserved place Ellie!
EJWilkins: It is, isn't it
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 27 Sep 2010, 12:56
Great angle and I am glad they are restoring it.
EJWilkins: I think they probably try to restore the house too, because it would also be quite special due to its age.
Very nice Ellie. It amazes me how much it around all over Spain, apparently falling into rack and ruin, then suddenly "discovered" and put of the list of works for restoration.
EJWilkins: I think the same sort of thing is happening / has happened all over the Iberian Peninsular Sheila, with 'lost' sites being rediscovered during renovations and repairs - for example the Baths in Evora, that are inside the town hall.
  • Scotia
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Sep 2010, 21:09
These splendid old roman ruins atr amazing structures Ellie.
EJWilkins: Yes, a couple of thousand years and still standing, and still 'in use' until 1972. Amazing isn't it
Beautifully captured, Ellie. Amazing that they built this without the aid of our modern equipment.

btw....I have summoned the BT engineer for the third time in a many days. He is coming on Wednesday.....and I am not letting him leave until he has fixed my broadband. Check the front of next week`s Advertiser, there maybe an interesting `kidnapping` story! lol! (:o)
EJWilkins: I remember seeing a display of building practice at Stirling Castle, they used bamboo for scaffolding! I sometimes wonder if we could achieve the same these days, without big machines to help us.

(BT won't talk to us because they don't provide our internet. They disconnect the call. Our providers say there isn't a problem ... but there is, and I too feel like rebelling, but the rules don't exactly seem to be on the customer's side. They seem to say that the bandwidth/speed you pay for is the maximum rather than what should be the norm. ... We need to do some looking, and some thinking about a new provider, maybe it'll improve things, but maybe not, because all the telephone cables are so very old. Ours haven't ever been either replaced or upgraded since we've lived here.)
Nice shot of the temple. it does look a little precarious. I'm always disappointed by the restoration work being done when I hoping to take pictures of sights smile
  • Peter
  • Canada
  • 30 Sep 2010, 04:49
You took this shot at a great angle Ellie....good composition....petersmile
  • Shaun
  • Turkey
  • 30 Sep 2010, 06:49
A very interesting photograph. I live a few miles from the Roman ruins at Ephesus, here in Turkey, where the Library of Celsus, is situated.
Merida is really an interresting place !

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