E.J.Wilkins

08 Oct 2010 534 views
 
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photoblog image Setley Pond

Setley Pond

Model yachts with Sway Tower in the background

Taken last Tuesday when Sir Tiff and I met up for a very pleasant day out. If you haven't already seen his excellent picture of these model (radio-controlled) yachts and their sailing masters it's here. (Others of mine are here.)

 

In the background is what's generally known locally as "Sway Tower", although there is an online reference to it being called "Peterson's Folly".

 

More about the Tower from Engineering Timelines :-


Sway Tower, a Grade II listed folly in the heart of Hampshire's New Forest, is possibly the first tall mass concrete structure in Britain. It was built by eccentric Yorkshireman and judge Andrew Peterson, on his retirement from the Indian Legal Service. Allegedly, he was inspired by Sir Christopher Wren, who appeared to a local medium in seances.

The tower is 66m tall and 5.5m square, and took a team of 40 workmen around five years to construct. It rests on a foundation 2.7m deep, and the concrete is 600mm thick at the base of the tower and 300mm thick at the top. Concrete was poured in 500mm lifts, using an internal working platform to avoid the need for cranes or scaffolding.

The tower’s 13 floors are supported on cast iron beams. It contains 11 large rooms. There is a spiral staircase — with almost 400 steps — housed externally in a 2.7m wide octagonal stairwell.

In December 1879, prompted by the Tay Bridge disaster, Peterson asked consulting engineer Rollo Massey to check the stability of the new tower, which proved satisfactory. Peterson had intended a light for the top of the tower but it didn't go ahead as it was thought vessels in the Solent would mistake it for a lighthouse.

Before the main tower was constructed, Peterson had built a smaller structure some 150m north of Sway Tower, perhaps to test the method. This sibling tower has six floors and an internal spiral staircase. It is now in a poor state of repair and its entrance has been sealed.

Peterson died in 1906 and Sway Tower became his mausoleum until the 1950s.
There was expensive restoration following the 1987 hurricane. These days the tower is used as a communications mast, and the low-level buildings adjoining it contain Bed & Breakfast accommodation.

 

The Tower is here.

Setley Pond is here.

 

Apologies for lack of replies and/or comments. Things are a bit hectic just now.

.

Setley Pond

Model yachts with Sway Tower in the background

Taken last Tuesday when Sir Tiff and I met up for a very pleasant day out. If you haven't already seen his excellent picture of these model (radio-controlled) yachts and their sailing masters it's here. (Others of mine are here.)

 

In the background is what's generally known locally as "Sway Tower", although there is an online reference to it being called "Peterson's Folly".

 

More about the Tower from Engineering Timelines :-


Sway Tower, a Grade II listed folly in the heart of Hampshire's New Forest, is possibly the first tall mass concrete structure in Britain. It was built by eccentric Yorkshireman and judge Andrew Peterson, on his retirement from the Indian Legal Service. Allegedly, he was inspired by Sir Christopher Wren, who appeared to a local medium in seances.

The tower is 66m tall and 5.5m square, and took a team of 40 workmen around five years to construct. It rests on a foundation 2.7m deep, and the concrete is 600mm thick at the base of the tower and 300mm thick at the top. Concrete was poured in 500mm lifts, using an internal working platform to avoid the need for cranes or scaffolding.

The tower’s 13 floors are supported on cast iron beams. It contains 11 large rooms. There is a spiral staircase — with almost 400 steps — housed externally in a 2.7m wide octagonal stairwell.

In December 1879, prompted by the Tay Bridge disaster, Peterson asked consulting engineer Rollo Massey to check the stability of the new tower, which proved satisfactory. Peterson had intended a light for the top of the tower but it didn't go ahead as it was thought vessels in the Solent would mistake it for a lighthouse.

Before the main tower was constructed, Peterson had built a smaller structure some 150m north of Sway Tower, perhaps to test the method. This sibling tower has six floors and an internal spiral staircase. It is now in a poor state of repair and its entrance has been sealed.

Peterson died in 1906 and Sway Tower became his mausoleum until the 1950s.
There was expensive restoration following the 1987 hurricane. These days the tower is used as a communications mast, and the low-level buildings adjoining it contain Bed & Breakfast accommodation.

 

The Tower is here.

Setley Pond is here.

 

Apologies for lack of replies and/or comments. Things are a bit hectic just now.

.

comments (17)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 8 Oct 2010, 01:13
Great image
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 8 Oct 2010, 02:17
Further concrete proof of the eccenticity of the Brits...may they always remain so!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 8 Oct 2010, 06:37
This is a fine & intriguing picture Ellie
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 8 Oct 2010, 06:47
When I first saw Tiff's image the other day, Ellie, I was sold on the spot. We see older guys here with their remote boat toys here on the canals but I had never seen the sailboats. Since Astrid was a sailboater in her past life, I can see her having fun with one of these. Actually, I would, too. What a great hobby (if ever my eyes aren't good enough for photography any more)! And as always, your post is educational!
  • Scotia
  • United Kingdom
  • 8 Oct 2010, 07:20
So many boats on this pond do they ever crash into each other?
I wonder if you can get radio controlled submarines?
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 8 Oct 2010, 10:11
Were they racing when you were there, its just so intense its amazing
Beautiful capture of the mini regatta Ellie!
This looks as if it might be loads of fun, Ellie. Very interesting background information.
Seems both you and Chris had a wonderful day out and you`ve left us with terrific photo`s of a truly fascinating hobby
A fine mix of subjects Ellie, the tower has an interesting history.
  • Tracy
  • UK
  • 8 Oct 2010, 16:57
I used to love playing with remote control boats as a kid at the park...Lovely image Ellie
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 9 Oct 2010, 07:48
Now I've ever seen this pond once before and that was around 40 years ago. I'd gone out out horseriding with a girlfriend to impress her and the horse decided that it was going to geta drink from the pond no matter what I said or did with it! I remember someone else asking me if I had any control of the horse - ummmm.. NO! Thanks for the memory. Good to see the tower, too.
  • Peter
  • Canada
  • 18 Oct 2010, 22:00
Beautiful composition Ellie.....if they had been a bit further from shore i would have thought that they were full size yachts.....the landscape in the background turned out very well for a damp day.....petersmile
its takes me back to my childhood when i had a yaught, were not remote control then like todays, had to race round to wherever it was heading, lovely tranquil shot
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 27 Oct 2010, 07:58
MESSAGE FROM E.J. WILKINS: our internet not good, could you pass on message on S/C for me, if time
Great persepctive with the small boats

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