E.J.Wilkins

15 Nov 2010 633 views
 
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photoblog image Mérida, Spain

Mérida, Spain

 

The Guadiana Bridge (Puente Romano)

 

The easiest way to describe this bridge is by quoting the 1992 UNESCO evaluation of this bridge is as follows:


The bridge, which is still in use, is the longest known from the Roman period, at 792 metres (866 yards/ almost 1/2 mile) overall length. It consists of two sections of arches linked by a large pier with massive cutwaters, built in granite and concrete. Much of the original Roman structure survives, especially at the two ends. It dates from the foundation of the colony in 25 BC. Another, smaller, bridge from the same period spans the Albarregas brook, a tributary of the Guadiana.

 

The bridge was closed to vehicular traffic in 1993.

 

Oh, and in case you're wondering, the Romans used a fair bit of concrete.

 

Adjacent to this end of the bridge, and from where this picture was taken, is The Alcazaba (gate/fort), which was originally Roman, then Visigoth. The present structure is believed to date from 9th century when it was rebuilt by 'Abd Allah ibn Kulaib, for the Emir, 'Abd ar-Rahman ibn al-Hakam' following a local rebellion.

.

Mérida, Spain

 

The Guadiana Bridge (Puente Romano)

 

The easiest way to describe this bridge is by quoting the 1992 UNESCO evaluation of this bridge is as follows:


The bridge, which is still in use, is the longest known from the Roman period, at 792 metres (866 yards/ almost 1/2 mile) overall length. It consists of two sections of arches linked by a large pier with massive cutwaters, built in granite and concrete. Much of the original Roman structure survives, especially at the two ends. It dates from the foundation of the colony in 25 BC. Another, smaller, bridge from the same period spans the Albarregas brook, a tributary of the Guadiana.

 

The bridge was closed to vehicular traffic in 1993.

 

Oh, and in case you're wondering, the Romans used a fair bit of concrete.

 

Adjacent to this end of the bridge, and from where this picture was taken, is The Alcazaba (gate/fort), which was originally Roman, then Visigoth. The present structure is believed to date from 9th century when it was rebuilt by 'Abd Allah ibn Kulaib, for the Emir, 'Abd ar-Rahman ibn al-Hakam' following a local rebellion.

.

comments (22)

thats one long bridge, excellent photo
EJWilkins: It is indeed a long bridge, worth seeing
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 15 Nov 2010, 01:47
Wonderful old bridge...eerrr...viaduct.
EJWilkins: You're right! Funny how we happily use the word aqueduct, but prefer the easy option for a road bridge
Fascinating stuff Ellie. Never knew the Romans used concrete
EJWilkins: I didn't either, until Adam Hart Davis mentioned it.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 15 Nov 2010, 06:45
This is wonderful Ellie: a fine picture & fascinating history. Good weather too!
EJWilkins: It was indeed wonderful weather, although it was really a bit too warm for sightseeing
  • vintage
  • Brisbane Australia
  • 15 Nov 2010, 07:38
Stunning photo of this great bridge
EJWilkins: The Alcazaba certainly offered the best view, which is probably why they built it.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 15 Nov 2010, 08:07
Built to last
EJWilkins: Most certainly was, and was in the right place too, otherwise it'd have fallen out of use
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 15 Nov 2010, 08:29
The Romans delivered quality structures with their slaves. Impressive.
EJWilkins: Yep, they did!
This reminds me a bit of the bridge at Toledo.
This is wonderful Ellie. I really like the perspective!
A fine bridge and thanks for the history Ellie.
Impressive bridge, and impressive photo of impressive reflections.
Impressive bridge, and impressive photo of impressive reflections.
Impressive bridge, and impressive photo of impressive reflections.
What an amazing structure. Great capture, Ellie! Thank you, too, for the interesting information. (:o)
Fine picture, fine structure.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 16 Nov 2010, 05:33
Impressive view...love the perspective
  • Peter
  • Canada
  • 16 Nov 2010, 06:40
This shot is beautiful Ellie and the depth perception is right out of the picture.....well dome....petersmile
The Romans were truly amazing at everything they did this is a beautiful example.
Thats got to be one of the oldest bridgest in the world?
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 16 Nov 2010, 08:57
That kind of history totally blows my mind, Ellie!
My hubby (Italian) has always bragged about the longevity & beauty of Roman construction. After looking at this magnificent structure, Ellie, I can see why.
Super Bridge. The Romans were great builders. Spain is a great place to visit. Nice shot.

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